IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/aea/aecrev/v95y2005i2p229-233.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Health and Wealth among the Poor: India and South Africa Compared

Author

Listed:
  • Anne Case
  • Angus Deaton

Abstract

Health and wealth are the two most important components of well-being. Rankings of well-being based on income will differ from more comprehensive rankings depending on the way that income and health are related. There are strong bidirectional causal links between income and health so that we cannot understand either without understanding both. What we call the ?wealthier is healthier? hypothesis asserts both that income is the main determinant of health, and that the international correlation between income and health is sufficiently tight for income rankings to indicate well-being more broadly.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Anne Case & Angus Deaton, 2005. "Health and Wealth among the Poor: India and South Africa Compared," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(2), pages 229-233, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:95:y:2005:i:2:p:229-233
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/000282805774670310
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/000282805774670310
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to AEA members and institutional subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version below or search for a different version of it.

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Lant Pritchett & Lawrence H. Summers, 1996. "Wealthier is Healthier," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 31(4), pages 841-868.
    2. Abhijit Banerjee & Angus Deaton & Esther Duflo, 2004. "Wealth, Health, and Health Services in Rural Rajasthan," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(2), pages 326-330, May.
    3. Fabrice Etilé & Carine Milcent, 2006. "Income-related reporting heterogeneity in self-assessed health: evidence from France," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(9), pages 965-981.
    4. Abhijit Banerjee & Angus Deaton & Esther Duflo, 2004. "Health care delivery in rural rajasthan," Framed Field Experiments 00120, The Field Experiments Website.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Fabrice Etilé & Carine Milcent, 2006. "Income-related reporting heterogeneity in self-assessed health: evidence from France," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(9), pages 965-981.
    2. Wittenberg, Martin, 2007. "Testing for a common latent variable in a linear regression," MPRA Paper 2550, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Abhijit V. Banerjee & Esther Duflo, 2007. "The Economic Lives of the Poor," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 21(1), pages 141-168, Winter.
    4. James M. Poterba & Steven F. Venti & David A. Wise, 2013. "The Nexus of Social Security Benefits, Health, and Wealth at Death," NBER Chapters,in: Discoveries in the Economics of Aging, pages 159-182 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Angus Deaton, 2005. "The Great Escape: A Review Essay on Fogel's The Escape from Hunger and Premature Death, 1700-2100," Working Papers 166, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Research Program in Development Studies..
    6. Salma Kousar & Anwar Hussain, 2017. "Socio-economic and Environmental Factors Affecting Health in District Bhimber (AJK)," Working Papers id:12178, eSocialSciences.
    7. Espinoza-Delgado, Jose & Klasen, Stephan, 2017. "Gender and Multidimensional Poverty in Nicaragua, An Individual-based Approach," MPRA Paper 81907, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Feeny, Simon & McDonald, Lachlan & Posso, Alberto, 2014. "Are Poor People Less Happy? Findings from Melanesia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 448-459.
    9. Averett, Susan L. & Stacey, Nicholas & Wang, Yang, 2014. "Decomposing race and gender differences in underweight and obesity in South Africa," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 15(C), pages 23-40.
    10. Manoj K Pandey & Vani S Kulkarni & Raghav Gaiha, 2017. "Aging, depression, and non-communicable diseases in South Africa," Departmental Working Papers 2017-04, The Australian National University, Arndt-Corden Department of Economics.
    11. Sanghamitra Das & Abhiroop Mukhopadhyay & Tridip Ray, 2008. "Negative reality of the HIV positives: Evaluating welfare loss in a low prevalence country," Indian Statistical Institute, Planning Unit, New Delhi Discussion Papers 08-02, Indian Statistical Institute, New Delhi, India.
    12. Fabrice Etilé & Carine Milcent, 2006. "Income-related reporting heterogeneity in self-assessed health: evidence from France," Working Papers halshs-00590524, HAL.
    13. Kumar, Ashutosh & Rahman, Tauhidur, 2018. "Can a Women’s Rural Livelihood Program Improve Mental Health? Experimental Evidence from India," 2018 Annual Meeting, August 5-7, Washington, D.C. 274137, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:95:y:2005:i:2:p:229-233. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Michael P. Albert). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/aeaaaea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.