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Health care delivery in rural rajasthan


  • Abhijit Banerjee
  • Angus Deaton
  • Esther Duflo


There is surprisingly little information about the delivery of health care in rural India, and about the relationship, if any, between health care and health status. Some, such as the Commission on Macroeconomics and Health of the World Health Organization (2001), have argued that better health care is the key to improving health as well as economic growth in poor countries, but there is little systematic evidence that gives us a sense of how easy it is to impact the quality of health care delivery in developing countries and through these improvements to impact the health of the population. This paper reports on a recent survey in a poor rural area of the state of Rajasthan in India intended to shed some light on this issue, where we use a set of interlocking surveys to collect data on health and economic status, as well as the public and private provision of health care.

Suggested Citation

  • Abhijit Banerjee & Angus Deaton & Esther Duflo, 2004. "Health care delivery in rural rajasthan," Framed Field Experiments 00120, The Field Experiments Website.
  • Handle: RePEc:feb:framed:00120

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Chaudhury, Nazmul & Hammer, Jeffrey S., 2003. "Ghost doctors - absenteeism in Bangladeshi health facilities," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3065, The World Bank.
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    1. Abhijit Banerjee & Rema Hanna, 2012. "Corruption," Introductory Chapters,in: Sendhil Mullainathan & Robert Gibbons & John Roberts (ed.), The Handbook of Organizational Economics Princeton University Press.
      • Hanna, Rema N. & Mullainathan, Sendhil & Banerjee, Abhijit, 2012. "Corruption," Scholarly Articles 8830779, Harvard Kennedy School of Government.
      • Abhijit Banerjee & Sendhil Mullainathan & Rema Hanna, 2012. "Corruption," NBER Working Papers 17968, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
      • Abhijit Banerjee & Rema Hanna & Sendhil Mullainathan, 2012. "Corruption," Working Papers id:4952, eSocialSciences.
      • Banerjee, Abhijit & Hanna, Rema & Mullainathan, Sendhil, 2012. "Corruption," Working Paper Series rwp12-023, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
    2. Gonçalves, Sónia, 2014. "The Effects of Participatory Budgeting on Municipal Expenditures and Infant Mortality in Brazil," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 94-110.
    3. Susan Godlonton & Edward N. Okeke, 2015. "Does a Ban on Informal Health Providers Save Lives? Evidence from Malawi," Working Papers WR-1073-1, RAND Corporation.
    4. repec:eee:joecag:v:7:y:2016:i:c:p:43-52 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Leonard, Kenneth L. & Masatu, Melkiory C., 2010. "Using the Hawthorne effect to examine the gap between a doctor's best possible practice and actual performance," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(2), pages 226-234, November.
    6. Subhrendu Pattanayak & Shubhayu Saha & Pravash Sahu & Erin Sills & Ashok Singha & JuiChen Yang, 2010. "Mine over matter? Health, wealth and forests in a mining area of Orissa," Indian Growth and Development Review, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 3(2), pages 166-185, September.
    7. Godlonton, Susan & Okeke, Edward N., 2016. "Does a ban on informal health providers save lives? Evidence from Malawi," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 118(C), pages 112-132.
    8. Ahmed, Syed Masud & Hossain, Md. Awlad, 2007. "Knowledge and practice of unqualified and semi-qualified allopathic providers in rural Bangladesh: Implications for the HRH problem," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 84(2-3), pages 332-343, December.
    9. Edward N. Okeke & Amalavoyal V. Chari, 2015. "Can Institutional Deliveries Reduce Newborn Mortality? Evidence from Rwanda," Working Papers WR-1072, RAND Corporation.
    10. Abhijit Banerjee & Esther Duflo, 2006. "Addressing Absence," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 20(1), pages 117-132, Winter.
    11. Michael Callen & Saad Gulzar & Ali Hasanain & Abdul Rehman Khan & Yasir Khan & Muhammad Zia Mehmood, 2013. "Improving Public Health Delivery in Punjab, Pakistan: Issues and Opportunities," Lahore Journal of Economics, Department of Economics, The Lahore School of Economics, vol. 18(Special E), pages 249-269, September.
    12. Owen O’Donnell & Ravi P. Rannan-Eliya & Aparnaa Somanathan & Shiva Raj Adhikari & Deni Harbianto & Charu C. Garg & Piya Hanvoravongchai & Mohammed N. Huq & Anup Karan & Gabriel M. Leung & Badri Raj , 2010. "Who benefits from public spending on health care in Asia?," Working Papers id:2626, eSocialSciences.
    13. Kaveri Gill, 2009. "A Primary Evaluation of Service Delivery under the National Rural Health Mission (NRHM): Findings from a Study in Andhra Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh, Bihar and Rajasthan," Working Papers id:2006, eSocialSciences.
    14. Dizon-Ross, Rebecca & Dupas, Pascaline & Robinson, Jonathan, 2015. "Governance and the Effectiveness of Public Health Subsidies," CEPR Discussion Papers 10690, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    15. Anne Case & Angus Deaton, 2005. "Health and Wealth among the Poor: India and South Africa Compared," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(2), pages 229-233, May.
    16. Matthew McCartney & Indrajit Roy, 2016. "A Consensus Unravels: NREGA and the Paradox of Rules-Based Welfare in India," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan;European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI), vol. 28(4), pages 588-604, September.
    17. Diether Beuermann & Maria Amelina, 2014. "Does Participatory Budgeting Improve Decentralized Public Service Delivery?," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 87095, Inter-American Development Bank.
    18. Eddy van Doorslaer, 2007. "Paying Out-of-Pocket for Health Care in Asia: Catastrophic and Poverty Impact," Working Papers id:823, eSocialSciences.
    19. Jishnu Das, 2011. "The Quality of Medical Care in Low-Income Countries: From Providers to Markets," Working Papers id:3955, eSocialSciences.
    20. Pascaline Dupas & Edward Miguel, 2016. "Impacts and Determinants of Health Levels in Low-Income Countries," NBER Working Papers 22235, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    21. Lori Beaman, 2007. "Women Politicians, Gender Bias, and Policy-making in Rural India," Working Papers id:835, eSocialSciences.

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