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Gender effects of education on economic development in Turkey

Author

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  • Aysit Tansel
  • Nil Gungor

Abstract

Purpose - – This study is concerned with the separate output effects of female and male education, as well as output effects of the educational gender gap. Several recent empirical studies have examined the gender effects of education on economic growth or on output level using the much exploited, familiar cross-country data. This paper aims to undertake a similar study of the gender effects of education on economic growth using a panel data across the provinces of Turkey for the period 1975-2000. Design/methodology/approach - – The theoretical basis of the estimating equations is the neoclassical growth model augmented to include separate female and male education capital and health capital variables. The methodology the authors use includes robust regression on pooled panel data controlling for regional and time effects. The results are found to be robust to a number of sensitivity analyses, such as elimination of outlier observations, controls for simultaneity and measurement errors, controls for omitted variables by including regional dummy variables, steady-state versus growth equations and different samples of developed and less-developed provinces of Turkey. Findings - – The main findings indicate that female education positively and significantly affects the steady-state level of labor productivity, while the effect of male education is in general either positive or insignificant. Separate examination of the effect of educational gender gap was to reduce output. Originality/value - – As evident in the literature, there is controversy surrounding the gender effects of education on growth. This paper provides new evidence on this issue from the perspective of a single country rather than a cross-country viewpoint.

Suggested Citation

  • Aysit Tansel & Nil Gungor, 2013. "Gender effects of education on economic development in Turkey," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, vol. 40(6), pages 794-821, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:eme:jespps:v:40:y:2013:i:6:p:794-821
    DOI: 10.1108/JES-10-2012-0140
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    Cited by:

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    2. Sumru Oz, 2017. "Is There an Income Convergence across Provinces of Turkey?," Koç University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum Working Papers 1711, Koc University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum.
    3. Abdalali Monsef & Abolfazl Shahmohammadi Mehrjardi, 2015. "Investigation Development Degree of Esfahan Province of Iran in Terms of Educational Indices," International Journal of Asian Social Science, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 5(1), pages 37-44, January.
    4. Jusaj Yvesa & Fetai Besnik, 2022. "Does Female Education Generate Economic Growth? An Empirical Analysis of Western Balkan Countries," Studia Universitatis Babeș-Bolyai Oeconomica, Sciendo, vol. 67(1), pages 1-10, April.
    5. Dongxu Wu & Zhongmin Wu, 2015. "Intergenerational links, gender differences, and determinants of self-employment," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, vol. 42(3), pages 400-414, August.
    6. Serap Bedir Kara & Aysegul Coskun, 2020. "The Impact of Gender Inequalities in Education on Income Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR)," Eurasian Journal of Social Sciences, Eurasian Publications, vol. 8(4), pages 148-162.
    7. Dadon-Golan, Zehorit & BenDavid-Hadar, Iris & Klein, Joseph, 2019. "Revisiting educational (in)equity: Measuring educational Gini coefficients for Israeli high schools during the years 2001–2011," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 1-1.
    8. Edward Nissan & Farhang Niroomand, 2015. "Gender and Spatial Educational Attainment Gaps in Turkey," Asian Economic and Financial Review, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 5(1), pages 102-109, January.
    9. Yasar Ersan & Ilhan Can Ozen, 2022. "Once Upon a Time in Anatolia: The Long Run Development Effects of American Missions in Anatolia," ERC Working Papers 2201, ERC - Economic Research Center, Middle East Technical University, revised Jan 2022.
    10. Raifu, Sisiaka Akande & Nnadozie, Obianuju Ogochukwu & Opeloyeru, Olaide Sekinat, 2021. "The Mediating Role of Institutional Quality in Human Capital-Economic Growth Nexus in Nigeria: Evidence from Aggregate and Gender Perspective," Journal of Economic Development, The Economic Research Institute, Chung-Ang University, vol. 46(4), pages 157-188, December.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Education; Economic development; Turkey; Gender; Labor productivity;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

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