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Access to Health Infrastructure and Child Health Development: Evidence from Post-Apartheid South Africa

  • Shinsuke Tanaka
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    A growing body of literature shows that child health has substantial long-term economic impacts. This study examines whether, and to what extent, increased access to health infrastructure leads to better child health status as measured by weight-for-age z-scores. To assess the causal relationship, I exploit plausibly exogenous variation in access induced by the dramatic change in health policy in South Africa immediately after the end of apartheid. Using longitudinal household data, health services are found to improve the nutritional status of not only newly born babies but also children who were already born at low health status. Yet, the effects are significant only for boys.

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    File URL: http://www.iser.osaka-u.ac.jp/library/dp/2010/DP0768.pdf
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    Paper provided by Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University in its series ISER Discussion Paper with number 0768.

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    Date of creation: Oct 2008
    Date of revision: Jan 2010
    Handle: RePEc:dpr:wpaper:0768
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