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KwaZulu-Natal Income Dynamics Study (KIDS) 1993-98: A longitudinal household database for South African policy analysis

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  • Julian May
  • Michael Carter
  • Lawrence Haddad
  • John Maluccio

Abstract

An important adjunct of apartheid has been the absence of credible and comprehensive data on which policies, such as poverty reduction strategies, can be grounded. The 1993 Project for Statistics on Living Standards and Development (PSLSD) provided the first comprehensive household database for South Africa. Despite its usefulness, however, the one round PSLSD cannot provide answers to many questions important to policy researchers and practitioners, particularly questions about dynamic processes. The primary objective in this article is to introduce a new longitudinal household database, based on the PSLSD, which begins to fill this gap. Households surveyed by the PSLSD in KwaZulu-Natal province were re-surveyed in 1998 by the KwaZulu-Natal Income Dynamics Survey (KIDS). As a research endeavour, the KIDS project addresses one of the most vexing and important problems confronting contemporary South Africa: understanding the forces and mechanisms which contribute to the perpetuation of apartheid's legacy of poverty and inequality.

Suggested Citation

  • Julian May & Michael Carter & Lawrence Haddad & John Maluccio, 2000. "KwaZulu-Natal Income Dynamics Study (KIDS) 1993-98: A longitudinal household database for South African policy analysis," Development Southern Africa, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(4), pages 567-581.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:deveza:v:17:y:2000:i:4:p:567-581
    DOI: 10.1080/03768350050173930
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    1. repec:eee:deveco:v:130:y:2018:i:c:p:33-44 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Haddad, Lawrence James & Maluccio, John A., 2002. "Trust, membership in groups, and household welfare," FCND discussion papers 135, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Adato, Michelle & Lund, Francie & Mhlongo, Phakama, 2007. "Methodological Innovations in Research on the Dynamics of Poverty: A Longitudinal Study in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 247-263, February.
    4. Martine Mariotti & Juergen Meinecke, 2009. "Nonparametric Bounds on Returns to Education in South Africa: Overcoming Ability and Selection Bias," ANU Working Papers in Economics and Econometrics 2009-510, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics.
    5. Carter, Michael R. & Maluccio, John A., 2002. "Social capital and coping with economic shocks," FCND discussion papers 142, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    6. Haddad, Lawrence James & Ahmed, Akhter U., 2002. "Avoiding chronic and transitory poverty," FCND discussion papers 133, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    7. Shinns, L.H. & Lyne, Michael C., 2004. "Symptoms of poverty within a group of land reform beneficiaries in the Midlands of KwaZulu-Natal: Analysis and policy recommendations," Agrekon, Agricultural Economics Association of South Africa (AEASA), vol. 43(1), March.
    8. Ito, Takahiro & Tanaka, Shinsuke, 2018. "Abolishing user fees, fertility choice, and educational attainment," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 130(C), pages 33-44.
    9. Shinsuke Tanaka, 2008. "Access to Health Infrastructure and Child Health Development: Evidence from Post-Apartheid South Africa," ISER Discussion Paper 0768, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University, revised Jan 2010.

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