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Measuring poverty persistence with missing data with an application to Peruvian panel data

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  • Diaz, Yadira
  • Pudney, Stephen

Abstract

We consider the estimation of measures of persistent poverty in panel surveys with missing data, focusing on the persistent poverty headcount, its duration-adjusted variant, and a related measure used by the European Union as an indicator of the risk of persistent poverty. We develop a partial identification approach to allow for data missing-not-at-random, and apply it to panel data from Peru for 2007-11. The “worst case†bounds are very wide, but we achieve much more precise identification by adding a set of weak a priori restrictions. Standard non-response weighting adjustments cannot be relied upon to remove missing-data bias.

Suggested Citation

  • Diaz, Yadira & Pudney, Stephen, 2013. "Measuring poverty persistence with missing data with an application to Peruvian panel data," ISER Working Paper Series 2013-22, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:ese:iserwp:2013-22
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    File URL: https://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/research/publications/working-papers/iser/2013-22.pdf
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