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Household Targeting In Practice: The Nicaraguan Red De Protección Social

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  • John Maluccio

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Abstract

This article describes the details underlying the targeting of a Nicaraguan anti-poverty program, emphasizing the rationale for how it was designed and implemented. It offers, by way of example, a guide for targeting in an anti-poverty program, and highlights some of the potential tradeoffs. It then goes on to present a quantitative assessment of how well the program was able to target poor households. A combination of ad hoc and statistical procedures led to targeting that was effective, with undercoverage rates of 10 percent or below and leakage rates of 15 percent or below. This was in spite of the fact that the targeting methodologies used were imprecise at both the household and geographic levels.

Suggested Citation

  • John Maluccio, 2008. "Household Targeting In Practice: The Nicaraguan Red De Protección Social," Middlebury College Working Paper Series 0802, Middlebury College, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:mdl:mdlpap:0802
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    File URL: http://www.middlebury.edu/services/econ/repec/mdl/ancoec/0802.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gilligan, Daniel O. & Veiga, Alinne, 2003. "An Evaluation Of Geographic Targeting In Bolsa Alimentação In Brazil," 2003 Annual meeting, July 27-30, Montreal, Canada 21915, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    2. David Coady & Margaret Grosh & John Hoddinott, 2004. "Targeting of Transfers in Developing Countries : Review of Lessons and Experience," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 14902.
    3. Chris Elbers & Jean O. Lanjouw & Peter Lanjouw, 2003. "Micro--Level Estimation of Poverty and Inequality," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 71(1), pages 355-364, January.
    4. Hentschel, Jesko, et al, 2000. "Combining Census and Survey Data to Trace the Spatial Dimensions of Poverty: A Case Study of Ecuador," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 14(1), pages 147-165, January.
    5. Bob Baulch & John Hoddinott, 2000. "Economic mobility and poverty dynamics in developing countries," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(6), pages 1-24.
    6. Castaneda, Tarsicio, 2005. "Targeting social spending to the poor with proxy - means testing: Colombia's SISBEN system," Social Protection and Labor Policy and Technical Notes 32759, The World Bank.
    7. David Coady, 2006. "The Welfare Returns to Finer Targeting: The Case of The Progresa Program in Mexico," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 13(2), pages 217-239, May.
    8. François Bourguignon & Satya Chakravarty, 2003. "The Measurement of Multidimensional Poverty," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 1(1), pages 25-49, April.
    9. Hentschel, J. & Lanjouw, P., 1996. "Constructing an Indicator of Consumption for the Analysis of Poverty. Principles and Illustrations with Reference to Ecuador," Papers 127, World Bank - Living Standards Measurement.
    10. Alain de Janvry & Elisabeth Sadoulet, 2006. "Making Conditional Cash Transfer Programs More Efficient: Designing for Maximum Effect of the Conditionality," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 20(1), pages 1-29.
    11. Angus Deaton & Salman Zaidi, 2002. "Guidelines for Constructing Consumption Aggregates for Welfare Analysis," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 14101.
    12. Ahmed, Akhter U. & Bouis, Howarth E., 2002. "Weighing what's practical: proxy means tests for targeting food subsidies in Egypt," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 27(5-6), pages 519-540.
    13. Hentschel, Jesko & Lanjouw, Jean Olson & Lanjouw, Peter & Poggi, Javier, 1998. "Combining census and survey data to study spatial dimensions of poverty," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1928, The World Bank.
    14. Carola Álvarez & Florencia Devoto & Paul Winters, 2006. "Why do the poor leave the safety net in Mexico? A study of the effects of conditionality on dropouts," Working Papers 2006-10, American University, Department of Economics.
    15. Skoufias, Emmanuel & Davis, Benjamin & de la Vega, Sergio, 2001. "Targeting the Poor in Mexico: An Evaluation of the Selection of Households into PROGRESA," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 29(10), pages 1769-1784, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Manley, James & Gitter, Seth & Slavchevska, Vanya, 2013. "How Effective are Cash Transfers at Improving Nutritional Status?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 133-155.
    2. John A. Maluccio & Alexis Murphy & Ferdinando Regalia, 2009. "Does Supply Matter? Initial Supply Conditions and the Effectiveness of Conditional Cash Transfers for Grade Progression in Nicaragua," Middlebury College Working Paper Series 0908, Middlebury College, Department of Economics.
    3. Ferdinando Regalía & Leslie Castro, 2007. "Performance-based Incentives for Health: Demand- and Supply-Side Incentives in the Nicaraguan Red de Protección Social," Working Papers 119, Center for Global Development.
    4. González-Flores, Mario & Heracleous, Maria & Winters, Paul, 2012. "Leaving the Safety Net: An Analysis of Dropouts in an Urban Conditional Cash Transfer Program," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(12), pages 2505-2521.
    5. Sudhanshu Handa & John A. Maluccio, 2010. "Matching the Gold Standard: Comparing Experimental and Nonexperimental Evaluation Techniques for a Geographically Targeted Program," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 58(3), pages 415-447, April.
    6. Stoeffler, Quentin & Mills, Bradford & del Ninno, Carlo, 2016. "Reaching the Poor: Cash Transfer Program Targeting in Cameroon," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 83(C), pages 244-263.
    7. Armando Barrientos, 2016. "Inequality, Poverty, and Antipoverty Transfers," Working Papers id:11190, eSocialSciences.
    8. Barham, Tania & Maluccio, John A., 2009. "Eradicating diseases: The effect of conditional cash transfers on vaccination coverage in rural Nicaragua," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 611-621, May.
    9. repec:eee:wdevel:v:97:y:2017:i:c:p:165-177 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Barham, Tania & Macours, Karen & Maluccio, John, 2017. "Are Conditional Cash Transfers Fulfilling Their Promise? Schooling, Learning, and Earnings After 10 Years," CEPR Discussion Papers 11937, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

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