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Eradicating diseases: The effect of conditional cash transfers on vaccination coverage in rural Nicaragua

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  • Barham, Tania
  • Maluccio, John A.

Abstract

Despite significant global efforts to improve vaccination coverage against major childhood diseases, vaccination rates are below 90%. To eradicate diseases such as measles, however, vaccination rates close to 95% are needed. We use a randomized experiment to investigate the effect of a demand incentive, a conditional cash transfer program, in improving vaccination coverage in rural Nicaragua. Double-difference estimates show the program led to large increases in vaccination coverage, and these resulted in vaccination levels greater than 95% for some vaccines. Effects were especially large for children who are typically harder to reach with traditional supply-side interventions.

Suggested Citation

  • Barham, Tania & Maluccio, John A., 2009. "Eradicating diseases: The effect of conditional cash transfers on vaccination coverage in rural Nicaragua," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 611-621, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:28:y:2009:i:3:p:611-621
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Gentilini,Ugo, 2016. "The revival of the"cash versus food"debate : new evidence for an old quandary ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7584, The World Bank.
    2. Cooper, Jan E. & Benmarhnia, Tarik & Koski, Alissa & King, Nicholas B., 2020. "Cash transfer programs have differential effects on health: A review of the literature from low and middle-income countries," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 247(C).
    3. Omar Galárraga & Sandra Sosa-Rubí & César Infante & Paul Gertler & Stefano Bertozzi, 2014. "Willingness-to-accept reductions in HIV risks: conditional economic incentives in Mexico," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 15(1), pages 41-55, January.
    4. Natalia Guerrero & Oswaldo Molina & Diego Winkelried, 2020. "Conditional cash transfers, spillovers, and informal health care: Evidence from Peru," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 29(2), pages 111-122, February.
    5. Miguel Niño‐Zarazúa, 2019. "Welfare and Redistributive Effects of Social Assistance in the Global South," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 45(S1), pages 3-22, December.
    6. Gil Shapira & Ina Kalisa & Jeanine Condo & James Humuza & Cathy Mugeni & Denis Nkunda & Jeanette Walldorf, 2018. "Going beyond incentivizing formal health providers: Evidence from the Rwanda Community Performance‐Based Financing program," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(12), pages 2087-2106, December.
    7. Ranjeeta Thomas, 2012. "Conditional Cash Transfers To Improve Education And Health: An Ex Ante Evaluation Of Red De Protección Social, Nicaragua," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(10), pages 1136-1154, October.
    8. Gentilini, Ugo, 2014. "Our daily bread : what is the evidence on comparing cash versus food transfers?," Social Protection Discussion Papers and Notes 89502, The World Bank.
    9. Steve Brito & Ana Corbacho & Rene Osorio, 2017. "Does birth under-registration reduce childhood immunization? Evidence from the Dominican Republic," Health Economics Review, Springer, vol. 7(1), pages 1-18, December.
    10. Susmita Baulia, 2020. "Cash incentives to mothers or to community health workers - what contributes better to the health of the mother and the newborn? Evidence from India," Discussion Papers 133, Aboa Centre for Economics.
    11. Tania Barham & Karen Macours & John A. Maluccio, 2013. "Boys' Cognitive Skill Formation and Physical Growth: Long-Term Experimental Evidence on Critical Ages for Early Childhood Interventions," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(3), pages 467-471, May.
    12. Martin Persson, U. & Alpízar, Francisco, 2013. "Conditional Cash Transfers and Payments for Environmental Services—A Conceptual Framework for Explaining and Judging Differences in Outcomes," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 124-137.
    13. Driessen, Julia & Olson, Zachary D. & Jamison, Dean T. & Verguet, Stéphane, 2015. "Comparing the health and social protection effects of measles vaccination strategies in Ethiopia: An extended cost-effectiveness analysis," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 139(C), pages 115-122.
    14. Susmita Baulia, 2018. "Is household shock a boon or bane to the utilisation of preventive healthcare for children? Evidence from Uganda," Discussion Papers 121, Aboa Centre for Economics.
    15. Ryoko Sato & Yoshito Takasaki, 2019. "Psychic vs. Economic Barriers to Vaccine Take-Up: Evidence from a Field Experiment in Nigeria," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 33(3), pages 622-642.
    16. Barrientos, Armando & Nino-Zarazua, Miguel, 2010. "Social Assistance in Developing Countries Database Version 5.0," MPRA Paper 20001, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    17. Barham, Tania, 2011. "A healthier start: The effect of conditional cash transfers on neonatal and infant mortality in rural Mexico," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(1), pages 74-85, January.
    18. Joshi, Shareen & Sivaram, Anusuya, 2014. "Does it Pay to Deliver? An Evaluation of India’s Safe Motherhood Program," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 434-447.
    19. Sudhanshu Handa & John A. Maluccio, 2010. "Matching the Gold Standard: Comparing Experimental and Nonexperimental Evaluation Techniques for a Geographically Targeted Program," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 58(3), pages 415-447, April.
    20. Ebenezer Owusu-Addo & Ruth Cross, 2014. "The impact of conditional cash transfers on child health in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 59(4), pages 609-618, August.
    21. Enami, Ali, 2016. "Determinants of Child Mortality in Africa: A Methodological Discussion," MPRA Paper 68671, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    22. Matthew Walsh & Santiago Poy & Ianina Tuñón, 2020. "The Impact of Health Conditionalities in Conditional Cash Transfer Programmes: the case of the AUH in Argentina," Revista Desarrollo y Sociedad, Universidad de los Andes - CEDE, vol. 85(4), June.
    23. Kusuma, Dian & Thabrany, Hasbullah & Hidayat, Budi & McConnell, Margaret & Berman, Peter & Cohen, Jessica, 2017. "New Evidence on the Impact of Large-scale Conditional Cash Transfers on Child Vaccination Rates: The Case of a Clustered-Randomized Trial in Indonesia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 98(C), pages 497-505.
    24. Mats Målqvist & Beibei Yuan & Nadja Trygg & Katarina Selling & Sarah Thomsen, 2013. "Targeted Interventions for Improved Equity in Maternal and Child Health in Low- and Middle-Income Settings: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 8(6), pages 1-10, June.
    25. Bharat Randive & Vishal Diwan & Ayesha De Costa, 2013. "India’s Conditional Cash Transfer Programme (the JSY) to Promote Institutional Birth: Is There an Association between Institutional Birth Proportion and Maternal Mortality?," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 8(6), pages 1-8, June.

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