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The Impact of Conditional Cash Transfers on Consumption and Investment in Nicaragua

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  • John A. Maluccio

Abstract

This article examines the impact of a Nicaraguan conditional cash transfer programme on measures of expenditures and productive investment. Despite clear evidence from a randomised evaluation that the programme increased current expenditures, there is little evidence that it increased agricultural or non-agricultural investment. An estimated marginal propensity to consume out of the transfers of nearly one, combined with no effect of cumulative past transfers on current consumption, corroborate the direct evidence on investment. In contrast to gains made in human capital investment, the potential for long term increases in consumption as a result of other forms of increased investment may be limited.
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  • John A. Maluccio, 2007. "The Impact of Conditional Cash Transfers on Consumption and Investment in Nicaragua," Middlebury College Working Paper Series 0722, Middlebury College, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:mdl:mdlpap:0722
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    2. Fitz, Dylan, 2013. "Development Chutes and Ladders: A Joint Impact Evaluation of Asset and Cash Transfers in Brazil," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 150254, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    3. Naila Kabeer & Hugh Waddington, 2015. "Economic impacts of conditional cash transfer programmes: a systematic review and meta-analysis," Journal of Development Effectiveness, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(3), pages 290-303, September.
    4. Chatura Sewwandi Wijetunga & Katsuhiro Saito, 2017. "Evaluating the Fertilizer Subsidy Reforms in the Rice Production Sector in Sri Lanka: A Simulation Analysis," Advances in Management and Applied Economics, SCIENPRESS Ltd, vol. 7(1), pages 1-3.
    5. Karamba, Wendy R. & Quiñones, Esteban J. & Winters, Paul, 2011. "Migration and food consumption patterns in Ghana," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 41-53, February.
    6. Kishore, Avinash & Joshi, Pramod K. & Pandey, Divya, 2015. "Droughts, Distress and a Conditional Cash Transfer Program to Mitigate the Impact of Droughtin Bihar, India," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 212009, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    7. M. Caridad Araujo & Mariano Bosch & Norbert Schady, 2017. "Can Cash Transfers Help Households Escape an Inter-Generational Poverty Trap?," NBER Chapters,in: The Economics of Asset Accumulation and Poverty Traps National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Das, Ashis Kumar & Friedman, Jed & Kandpal, Eeshani, 2013. "Utilizing Local Capacity to Supplement Government Health Programs: Cautionary Evidence from a Malaria Prevention RCT in India," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 150343, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    9. Jesse Cunha, 2010. "Testing Paternalism: Cash vs. In-kind Transfer in Rural Mexico," Discussion Papers 09-021, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.
    10. Verónica Amarante & Martí­n Brun, 2016. "Cash transfers in Latin America: Effects on poverty and redistribution," WIDER Working Paper Series 136, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    11. Das, Ashis & Friedman, Jed & Kandpal, Eeshani, 2014. "Does involvement of local NGOs enhance public service delivery ? cautionary evidence from a Malaria-prevention evaluation in India," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6931, The World Bank.
    12. Cecchini, Simone & Madariaga, Aldo, 2011. "Conditional cash transfer programmes: the recent experience in Latin America and the Caribbean," Cuadernos de la CEPAL, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL), number 95 edited by Eclac, March.
    13. Lara Cockx & Nathalie Francken, 2016. "Evolution and Impact of EU Aid for Food and Nutrition Security: A Review," FOODSECURE Working papers 47, LEI Wageningen UR.
    14. Bosch, Mariano & Manacorda, Marco, 2012. "Social policies and labor market outcomes in Latin America and the Caribbean: a review of the existing evidence," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 58003, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    15. Sloan, Sean, 2015. "The development-driven forest transition and its utility for REDD+," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 116(C), pages 1-11.
    16. M. Caridad Araujo & Mariano Bosch & Norbert Schady, 2017. "Can Cash Transfers Help Households Escape an Inter-Generational Poverty Trap?," NBER Chapters,in: The Economics of Poverty Traps National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    17. Bazzi, Samuel & Sumarto, Sudarno & Suryahadi, Asep, 2015. "It's all in the timing: Cash transfers and consumption smoothing in a developing country," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 119(C), pages 267-288.
    18. Yi, Fujin & Sun, Dingqiang & Zhou, Yingheng, 2015. "Grain subsidy, liquidity constraints and food security—Impact of the grain subsidy program on the grain-sown areas in China," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 114-124.
    19. Cristina Cirillo & Giorgia Giovannetti, 2018. "Do Cash Transfers Trigger Investment? Evidence for Peru," Development Working Papers 433, Centro Studi Luca d'Agliano, University of Milano, revised 29 Jan 2018.
    20. Yi, Fujin & Sun, Dingqiang, 2014. "Grain Subsidy, Liquidity Constraints and Food security—Impact of the Grain Subsidy Program on the Grain-Sown Areas in China," 2014 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2014, Minneapolis, Minnesota 169779, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

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