IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/vig/wpaper/1003.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Pobreza crónica, transitoria y recurrente en España

Author

Listed:
  • Olga Cantó
  • Carlos Gradín
  • Coral del Río

Abstract

Este trabajo analiza la dinámica de la pobreza en España identificando distintos perfiles en función de su duración temporal. Los resultados indican que la pobreza en España exhibe dos características importantes: un reducido número de individuos persistentemente pobres y un elevado nivel de recurrencia en la pobreza transitoria. Por eso en el caso español, y en contraste con otros países de la Unión Europea, resulta particularmente relevante distinguir entre los pobres transitorios que experimentan diferentes episodios de pobreza de forma recurrente de los que lo sufren una sola vez. La caracterización de las tipologías nos permite concluir también que la pobreza crónica afecta más a los hogares cuyo sustentador es de mayor edad o con bajo nivel de cualificación, así como a los que tienen un menor número de miembros asalariados. La pobreza transitoria y recurrente en cambio aparece ligada al empleo por cuenta propia y a la presencia de niños en el hogar.

Suggested Citation

  • Olga Cantó & Carlos Gradín & Coral del Río, 2010. "Pobreza crónica, transitoria y recurrente en España," Working Papers 1003, Universidade de Vigo, Departamento de Economía Aplicada.
  • Handle: RePEc:vig:wpaper:1003
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://webX06.webs.uvigo.es/sites/default/files/wp1003.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Canto, Olga, 2000. "Income Mobility in Spain: How Much Is There?," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 46(1), pages 85-102, March.
    2. Walter Bossert & Satya Chakravarty & Conchita D’Ambrosio, 2012. "Poverty and time," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 10(2), pages 145-162, June.
      • BOSSERT, Walter & CHAKRAVARTY, Satya R. & D’AMBROSIO, Conchita, 2008. "Poverty and Time," Cahiers de recherche 05-2008, Centre interuniversitaire de recherche en économie quantitative, CIREQ.
      • Bossert, Walter & Chakravarty, Satya R. & d’Ambrosio, Conchita, 2010. "Poverty and Time," WIDER Working Paper Series 074, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
      • BOSSERT, Walter & CHAKRAVARTY, Satya R. & D’AMBROSIO, Conchita, 2008. "Poverty and Time," Cahiers de recherche 2008-05, Universite de Montreal, Departement de sciences economiques.
      • Walter Bossert & Satya R. Chakravarty & Conchita D’Ambrosio, 2008. "Poverty and Time," Working Papers 87, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    3. Luis Ayala & Mercedes Sastre, 2008. "The structure of income mobility: empirical evidence from five UE countries," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 35(3), pages 451-473, November.
    4. Luis Ayala & Mercedes Sastre, 2004. "Europe vs. the United States: is there a trade-off between mobility and inequality?," Journal of Income Distribution, Journal of Income Distribution, vol. 13(1-2), pages 4-4, March-Jun.
    5. Atkinson, Tony & Cantillon, Bea & Marlier, Eric & Nolan, Brian, 2002. "Social Indicators: The EU and Social Inclusion," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199253494.
    6. Gardiner, Karen & Hills, John, 1999. "Policy Implications of New Data on Income Mobility," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 109(453), pages 91-111, February.
    7. Amuedo-Dorantes, Catalina & Serrano-Padial, Ricardo, 2010. "Labor market flexibility and poverty dynamics," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(4), pages 632-642, August.
    8. Slesnick,Daniel T., 2001. "Consumption and Social Welfare," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521497206, March.
    9. Joan R. Rodgers & John L. Rodgers, 1993. "Chronic Poverty in the United States," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 28(1), pages 25-54.
    10. Ayllón, Sara, 2008. "Modelling poverty transitions in Spain: Do attrition and initial conditions really matter?," IRISS Working Paper Series 2008-08, IRISS at CEPS/INSTEAD.
    11. Mary Jo Bane & David T. Ellwood, 1986. "Slipping into and out of Poverty: The Dynamics of Spells," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 21(1), pages 1-23.
    12. Ravallion, Martin, 1988. "Expected Poverty under Risk-Induced Welfare Variability," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 98(393), pages 1171-1182, December.
    13. Arranz, José Maria & Cantó, Olga, 2010. "Measuring the Effect of Spell Recurrence on Poverty Dynamics," WIDER Working Paper Series 072, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    14. Annelies Debels & Leen Vandecasteele, 2008. "The Time Lag In Annual Household-Based Income Measures: Assessing And Correcting The Bias," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 54(1), pages 71-88, March.
    15. Tullio Jappelli, 1990. "Who is Credit Constrained in the U. S. Economy?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 105(1), pages 219-234.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. repec:eme:reinzz:s1049-258520150000023004 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Olga Cantó & David O. Ruiz, 2015. "The Contribution of Income Mobility to Economic Insecurity in the US and Spain during the Great Recession," Research on Economic Inequality,in: Measurement of Poverty, Deprivation, and Economic Mobility, volume 23, pages 109-152 Emerald Publishing Ltd.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    duración de la pobreza; cronicidad; recurrencia;

    JEL classification:

    • D1 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior
    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:vig:wpaper:1003. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Departamento de Economía Aplicada). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/deviges.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.