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International Comparisons in Health Economics Evidence from Aging Studies

Author

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  • James Banks
  • James P. Smith

Abstract

The authors provide an overview of the growing literature that uses micro-level data from multiple countries to investigate health outcomes, and their link to socioeconomic factors, at older ages. Since the data are at a comparatively young stage, much of the analysis is at an early stage and limited to a handful of countries, with analysis for the US and England being the most common. What is immediately apparent as they get better measures is that health differences between countries amongst those at older ages are real and large. Countries are ranked differently according to whether one considers life-expectancy, prevalence or incidence of one condition or another. And the magnitude of international disparities may vary according to whether measures utilize doctor diagnosed conditions or biomarker-based indicators of disease and poor health. But one key finding emerges — the US ranks poorly on all indicators with the exception of self-reported subjective health status.

Suggested Citation

  • James Banks & James P. Smith, 2011. "International Comparisons in Health Economics Evidence from Aging Studies," Working Papers WR-880, RAND Corporation.
  • Handle: RePEc:ran:wpaper:wr-880
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. J. Gimenez-Nadal & Jose Molina, 2016. "Health inequality and the uses of time for workers in Europe: policy implications," IZA Journal of European Labor Studies, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 5(1), pages 1-18, December.
    2. Wang, Huixia & Wang, Chenggang & Halliday, Timothy J., 2018. "Health and health inequality during the great recession: Evidence from the PSID," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 17-30.
    3. repec:bla:revinw:v:63:y:2017:i:4:p:760-776 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. McGovern, Mark E., 2014. "Comparing the relationship between stature and later life health in six low and middle income countries," The Journal of the Economics of Ageing, Elsevier, vol. 4(C), pages 128-148.
    5. repec:eee:hapoch:v1_993 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • F00 - International Economics - - General - - - General

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