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What can we learn from (and about) global aging?

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  • Arie Kapteyn

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Abstract

Although aging is a global phenomenon, there are large differences across countries in both the speed of aging and the current state they are in. Furthermore countries adopt vastly different policies. This creates a natural laboratory that scientists can use to understand how policies affect outcomes. This paper discusses under what circumstances data from different countries can be used for inference about policy effects. Although currently comparable health and retirement data are being collected in some 25 countries, the use of such data requires careful modeling of differences in institutions and in response styles across countries.
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Suggested Citation

  • Arie Kapteyn, 2010. "What can we learn from (and about) global aging?," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 47(1), pages 191-209, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:47:y:2010:i:1:p:s191-s209 DOI: 10.1353/dem.2010.0006
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    1. Liam Delaney & Colm Harmon & Arthur Van Soest & Arie Kapteyn & James P. Smith, 2007. "Validating the use of vignettes for subjective threshold scales," Open Access publications 10197/580, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
    2. Arie Kapteyn & James Smith & Arthur van Soest & James Banks, 2007. "Labor Market Status and Transitions During the Pre-Retirement Years: Learning from International Differences," Working Papers wp149, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
    3. Jonathan Gruber & David A. Wise, 2010. "Social Security Programs and Retirement around the World: The Relationship to Youth Employment," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number grub08-1.
    4. Kapteyn, Arie & Alessie, Rob & Lusardi, Annamaria, 2005. "Explaining the wealth holdings of different cohorts: Productivity growth and Social Security," European Economic Review, Elsevier, pages 1361-1391.
    5. Arie Kapteyn & James P. Smith & Arthur van Soest, 2007. "Vignettes and Self-Reports of Work Disability in the United States and the Netherlands," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 461-473.
    6. Johnston, David W. & Propper, Carol & Shields, Michael A., 2009. "Comparing subjective and objective measures of health: Evidence from hypertension for the income/health gradient," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, pages 540-552.
    7. Datta Gupta, Nabanita & Kristensen, Nicolai & Pozzoli, Dario, 2010. "External validation of the use of vignettes in cross-country health studies," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 854-865, July.
    8. Arie Kapteyn & James P. Smith & Arthur van Soest & James Banks, 2010. "Labor Market Status and Transitions during the Pre-Retirement Years: Learning from International Differences," NBER Chapters,in: Research Findings in the Economics of Aging, pages 63-92 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Kristensen, Nicolai & Johansson, Edvard, 2008. "New evidence on cross-country differences in job satisfaction using anchoring vignettes," Labour Economics, Elsevier, pages 96-117.
    10. F. Thomas Juster & Richard Suzman, 1995. " An Overview of the Health and Retirement Study," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 30, pages s7-s56.
    11. G. Reza Arabsheibani & Alan Marin & Jonathan Wadsworth, 2005. "Gay Pay in the UK," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, pages 333-347.
    12. Arie Kapteyn & James P. Smith & Arthur Van Soest & Hana Vonkova, 2011. "Anchoring Vignettes and Response Consistency," Working Papers 840, RAND Corporation.
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    1. repec:eee:joecag:v:8:y:2016:i:c:p:42-51 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Brian K. Chen & Hawre Jalal & Hideki Hashimoto & Sze-Chuan Suen & Karen Eggleston & Michael Hurley & Lena Schoemaker & Jay Bhattacharya, 2016. "Forecasting Trends in Disability in a Super-Aging Society: Adapting the Future Elderly Model to Japan," NBER Working Papers 21870, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Cabus, Sofie J. & De Witte, Kristof, 2012. "Naming and shaming in a ‘fair’ way. On disentangling the influence of policy in observed outcomes," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, pages 767-787.
    4. Mark E. McGovern, 2016. "Comparing the Relationship Between Stature and Later Life Health in Six Low and Middle Income Countries," PGDA Working Papers 11814, Program on the Global Demography of Aging.
    5. Emmanuel Farhi & Iván Werning, 2017. "Fiscal Unions," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 3788-3834.
    6. Hanna Grol-Prokopczyk & Emese Verdes-Tennant & Mary McEniry & Márton Ispány, 2015. "Promises and Pitfalls of Anchoring Vignettes in Health Survey Research," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), pages 1703-1728.
    7. repec:eee:joecag:v:4:y:2014:i:c:p:128-148 is not listed on IDEAS

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