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Health status and the allocation of time

  • Melinda Podor
  • Timothy J. Halliday

We consider the relationship between health and time allocation. Better health is associated with more time allocated towards production on the market and at home, but less consumption of leisure. This suggests that health exerts large effects on market productivity, but larger effects on non-market productivity. These responses are higher for single people than for married people, perhaps reflecting a lack of market substitutes for the time of married people.

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Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Health Economics.

Volume (Year): 21 (2012)
Issue (Month): 5 (05)
Pages: 514-527

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Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:21:y:2012:i:5:p:514-527
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5749

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  1. Timothy Halliday, 2007. "Income Volatility and Health," Working Papers 200729, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Economics.
  2. James P. Smith, 1999. "Healthy Bodies and Thick Wallets: The Dual Relation between Health and Economic Status," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 13(2), pages 145-166, Spring.
  3. Diba, Behzad T. & Grossman, Herschel I., 1988. "Rational inflationary bubbles," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 35-46, January.
  4. Gronau, Reuben, 1980. "Home Production-A Forgotten Industry," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 62(3), pages 408-16, August.
  5. Deaton, A.S., 1993. "Data and Econometric Tools for Development Analysis," Papers 172, Princeton, Woodrow Wilson School - Development Studies.
  6. John Bound, 1991. "Self-Reported Versus Objective Measures of Health in Retirement Models," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 26(1), pages 106-138.
  7. Grossman, Michael, 1972. "On the Concept of Health Capital and the Demand for Health," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 80(2), pages 223-55, March-Apr.
  8. Rust, J., 1994. "How Social Security and Medicare Affect Retirement Behavior in a World of Incomplete Markets," Working papers 9430, Wisconsin Madison - Social Systems.
  9. Michael Baker & Mark Stabile & Catherine Deri, 2004. "What Do Self-Reported, Objective, Measures of Health Measure?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 39(4).
  10. Stephen Wu, 2003. "The Effects of Health Events on the Economic Status of Married Couples," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 38(1).
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