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Health and wealth of elderly couples: Causality tests using dynamic panel data models

  • Michaud, Pierre-Carl
  • van Soest, Arthur

A positive relationship between socio-economic status (SES) and health, the "health-wealth gradient", is repeatedly found in many industrialized countries. This study analyzes competing explanations for this gradient: causal effects from health to wealth (health causation) and causal effects from wealth to health (wealth or social causation). Using six biennial waves of couples aged 51-61 in 1992 from the US Health and Retirement Study, we test for causality in panel data models incorporating unobserved heterogeneity and a lag structure supported by specification tests. In contrast to tests relying on models with only first order lags or without unobserved heterogeneity, these tests provide no evidence of causal wealth health effects. On the other hand, we find strong evidence of causal effects from both spouses' health on household wealth. We also find an effect of the husband's health on the wife's mental health, but no other effects from one spouse's health to health of the other spouse.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Health Economics.

Volume (Year): 27 (2008)
Issue (Month): 5 (September)
Pages: 1312-1325

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:27:y:2008:i:5:p:1312-1325
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505560

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