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Consequences and predictors of new health events

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  • James Smith

    (Institute for Fiscal Studies and RAND Corporation)

Abstract

There is renewed interest in why people of lower socio-economic status (SES) have worse health outcomes. No matter which measures of SES are used (income, wealth, or education), the evidence that this association is large is abundant (Marmot (1999), Smith (1999)). The relation between SES and health appears also to be pervasive over time and across countries at quite different levels of economic development (Kitagawa and Hauser (1973), Townsend et al. (1988)). Considerable debate remains about why the relation arises and what the principal directions of causation might be ((Smith (1999), Adams et al. (2003), Deaton (2003)). However, many analytical difficulties exist when one tries to understand its meaning. These difficulties include the complex dimensionality of health status that produces considerable heterogeneity in health outcomes, the two-way interaction between health and economic status, and the separation of anticipated from unanticipated health or economic shocks.

Suggested Citation

  • James Smith, 2003. "Consequences and predictors of new health events," IFS Working Papers W03/22, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:ifs:ifsewp:03/22
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    File URL: http://www.ifs.org.uk/wps/wp0322.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:pri:cheawb:case_paxson_economic_status_paper is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Angus Deaton, 2003. "Health, Inequality, and Economic Development," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 41(1), pages 113-158, March.
    3. James Smith & Raynard Kington, 1997. "Demographic and economic correlates of health in old age," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 34(1), pages 159-170, February.
    4. Dana P. Goldman & James P. Smith, 2004. "Can Patient Self-Management Help Explain the SES Health Gradient?," HEW 0403004, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Peter Adams & Michael D. Hurd & Daniel L. McFadden & Angela Merrill & Tiago Ribeiro, 2004. "Healthy, Wealthy, and Wise? Tests for Direct Causal Paths between Health and Socioeconomic Status," NBER Chapters, in: Perspectives on the Economics of Aging, pages 415-526, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Anne Case & Darren Lubotsky & Christina Paxson, 2002. "Economic Status and Health in Childhood: The Origins of the Gradient," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(5), pages 1308-1334, December.
    7. James P. Smith, 2004. "Why is Wealth Inequality Rising?," Macroeconomics 0402012, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. repec:pri:cheawb:case_paxson_economic_status_paper.pdf is not listed on IDEAS
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    JEL classification:

    • I0 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - General

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