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The Impact of Aggregate and Idiosyncratic Income Shocks on Health Outcomes: Evidence from the PSID

Author

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  • Timothy Halliday

    (Department of Economics, University of Hawaii at Manoa
    John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii at Manoa)

Abstract

In this paper, we investigate the impact of aggregate and idiosyncratic economic shocks on health using data on self-reported health status and mortality from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics. First, we document a large correlation between poor macroeconomic conditions and mortality for working-aged men. This correlation is robust to controls for baseline health which mitigates concerns that the correlation is the result of selection. There is no relationship between macroeconomic conditions and mortality for women. Next, to better understand how much of this correlation is the result of a causal impact of income shocks on health, we use methods from the literature on dynamic panel data models. Doing this, we find evidence of a causal impact of income shocks on health for working-aged men at the lowest parts of the income distribution. Finally, our analysis provides no evidence that recessions are good for your health.

Suggested Citation

  • Timothy Halliday, 2006. "The Impact of Aggregate and Idiosyncratic Income Shocks on Health Outcomes: Evidence from the PSID," Working Papers 200606, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hai:wpaper:200606
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    File URL: http://www.economics.hawaii.edu/research/workingpapers/WP_06-6.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Colman, Gregory & Dave, Dhaval, 2013. "Exercise, physical activity, and exertion over the business cycle," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 11-20.
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    3. Xin Xu & Robert Kaestner, 2010. "The Business Cycle and Health Behaviors," NBER Working Papers 15737, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Xu, Xin, 2013. "The business cycle and health behaviors," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 126-136.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    gradient; recessions; health; dynamic panel data models;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I0 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - General
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics

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