IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/aph/ajpbhl/1982728800-808_7.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Self-rated health: a predictor of mortality among the elderly

Author

Listed:
  • Mossey, J.M.
  • Shapiro, E.

Abstract

Data from the Manitoba Longitudinal Study on Aging (MLSA) were used to test the hypothesis that self-rated health (SRH) is a predictor of mortality independent of "objective health status" (OHS). Subjects were a random sample of non-institutionalized residents of Manitoba aged 65+ in 1971 (n = 3,128). A single item measure of SRH was obtained during a survey conducted in 1971; a baseline measure of OHS was derived from physician and self-reported conditions and health service utilization data. Occurrence and date of death during the years 1971-1977 were known. Analyses of the data revealed that, controlling for OHS, age, sex, life satisfaction, income and urban/rural residence, the risk of early mortality (1971-1973) and late mortality (1974-1977) for persons whose SRH was poor was 2.92 and 2.77 times that of those whose SRH was excellent. This increased risk of death associated with poor self-rated health was greater than that associated with poor OHS, poor life satisfaction, low income and being male. These findings provide empirical support for the long held, but inadequately substantiated, belief that the way a person views his health is importantly related to subsequent health outcomes.

Suggested Citation

  • Mossey, J.M. & Shapiro, E., 1982. "Self-rated health: a predictor of mortality among the elderly," American Journal of Public Health, American Public Health Association, vol. 72(8), pages 800-808.
  • Handle: RePEc:aph:ajpbhl:1982:72:8:800-808_7
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
    1. Check below whether another version of this item is available online.
    2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
    3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:aph:ajpbhl:1982:72:8:800-808_7. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://www.apha.org .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no bibliographic references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Christopher F Baum (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://www.apha.org .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.