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Don’t Go Breaking your Heart: Do Economic Upturns Really Increase Heart Attack Mortality?

  • Svensson, Mikael

    ()

    (Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics)

Several recent papers in the literature have found that short-term economic upturns are bad for your health (a pro-cyclical effect). In this paper I explore the relationship between business cycles and incidence and mortality in acute myocardial infarction (heart attacks) in Sweden. The sample consists of 21 Swedish regions during the period 1987 to 2003. Results from the panel data estimations indicate that the business cycle effect is insignificant on overall rates of incidence and mortality. However, a counter-cyclical and significant effect is found in most specifications for those in prime working age between 20 and 49. It is also shown that a higher share of women, highly educated and non-foreigners decrease incidence and mortality. Further it is shown that results are sensitive to different business cycle proxies as well as different model specifications and previous results from the literature cannot be taken as universal for other countries or settings.

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Paper provided by Örebro University, School of Business in its series Working Papers with number 2006:8.

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Length: 21 pages
Date of creation: 01 Nov 2006
Date of revision: 01 Nov 2006
Publication status: Published in Social Science & Medicine, 2006.
Handle: RePEc:hhs:oruesi:2006_008
Contact details of provider: Postal: Örebro University School of Business, SE - 701 82 ÖREBRO, Sweden
Phone: 019-30 30 00
Fax: 019-33 25 46
Web page: http://www.oru.se/Institutioner/Handelshogskolan-vid-Orebro-universitet/

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  1. David M. Cutler & Mary Beth Landrum & Kate A. Stewart, 2006. "Intensive Medical Care and Cardiovascular Disease Disability Reductions," NBER Working Papers 12184, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Daniel Kahneman & Alan B. Krueger, 2006. "Developments in the Measurement of Subjective Well-Being," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 20(1), pages 3-24, Winter.
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  12. Jeff E. Biddle & Daniel S. Hamermesh, 1989. "Sleep and the Allocation of Time," NBER Working Papers 2988, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. Theodore Joyce & Naci Mocan, 1993. "Unemployment and Infant Health: Time-Series Evidence from the State of Tennessee," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 28(1), pages 185-203.
  14. Wagstaff, Adam, 1985. "Time series analysis of the relationship between unemployment and mortality: A survey of econometric critiques and replications of Brenner's studies," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 21(9), pages 985-996, January.
  15. Arellano, Manuel & Bond, Stephen, 1991. "Some Tests of Specification for Panel Data: Monte Carlo Evidence and an Application to Employment Equations," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 58(2), pages 277-97, April.
  16. Clark, Andrew E & Oswald, Andrew J, 1994. "Unhappiness and Unemployment," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 104(424), pages 648-59, May.
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