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Who is hurt by procyclical mortality?

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  • Edwards, Ryan

Abstract

There is renewed interest in understanding how fluctuations in mortality and in health are related to fluctuations in economic conditions. The traditional perspective that economic recessions lower health and raise mortality has been challenged by recent findings that reveal mortality is actually procyclical. The epidemiology of the phenomenon - traffic accidents, cardiovascular disease, and smoking and drinking - suggests that socioeconomically vulnerable populations might be disproportionately at risk of "working themselves to death" during periods of heightened economic activity. In this paper, I examine mortality by individual characteristic during the 1980s and 1990s using the U.S. National Longitudinal Mortality Study. I find scant evidence that disadvantaged groups are significantly more exposed to procyclical mortality. Rather, working-age men with more education appear to bear a heavier burden, while those with little education experience countercyclical mortality.

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  • Edwards, Ryan, 2008. "Who is hurt by procyclical mortality?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 67(12), pages 2051-2058, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:67:y:2008:i:12:p:2051-2058
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    3. Vellore Arthi & Brian Beach & W. Walker Hanlon, 2017. "Estimating the Recession-Mortality Relationship when Migration Matters," NBER Working Papers 23507, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Adam Mayer & Michelle Foster, 2015. "Understanding Recession and Self-Rated Health with the Partial Proportional Odds Model: An Analysis of 26 Countries," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 10(10), pages 1-19, October.
    5. Wang, Qing & Tapia Granados, José A., 2019. "Economic growth and mental health in 21st century China," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 220(C), pages 387-395.
    6. Lawrence Pellegrini & Rosa Rodriguez-Monguio & Jing Qian, 2014. "The US healthcare workforce and the labor market effect on healthcare spending and health outcomes," International Journal of Health Economics and Management, Springer, vol. 14(2), pages 127-141, June.
    7. Edwards Ryan D, 2009. "The Cost of Cyclical Mortality," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 9(1), pages 1-19, March.
    8. Perelman, Julian & Felix, Sónia & Santana, Rui, 2015. "The Great Recession in Portugal: Impact on hospital care use," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 119(3), pages 307-315.
    9. Dave, Dhaval M. & Kelly, Inas Rashad, 2012. "How does the business cycle affect eating habits?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 74(2), pages 254-262.
    10. José A. Tapia Granados & Edward L. Ionides, 2011. "Mortality and Macroeconomic Fluctuations in Contemporary Sweden [Mortalité et fluctuations macroéconomiques dans la Suède contemporaine]," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 27(2), pages 157-184, May.
    11. Betty Bekemeier & David Grembowski & Youngran Yang & Jerald R. Herting, 2014. "Are Local Public Health Department Services Related to Racial Disparities in Mortality?," SAGE Open, , vol. 4(1), pages 21582440145, March.
    12. Ferreira, Ernesto R. & Monteiro, João D. & Manso, José R. Pires, 2018. "Are economic crises age and gender neutral? Evidence from European Union mortality data," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 69-77.
    13. Haaland, Venke Furre & Telle, Kjetil, 2015. "Pro-cyclical mortality across socioeconomic groups and health status," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 248-258.

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