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Business cycles and mortality: results from Swedish microdata

Listed author(s):
  • Gerdtham, Ulf-G.
  • Johannesson, Magnus

We assess the relationship between business cycles and mortality risk using a large individual level data set on over 40,000 individuals in Sweden who were followed for 10-16 years (leading to over 500,000 person-year observations). We test the effect of six alternative business cycle indicators on the mortality risk: the unemployment rate, the notification rate, the deviation from the GDP trend, the GDP change, the industry capacity utilization, and the industry confidence indicator. For men we find a significant countercyclical relationship between the business cycle and the mortality risk for four of the indicators and a non-significant effect for the other two indicators. For women we cannot reject the null hypothesis of no effect for any of the business cycle indicators.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Social Science & Medicine.

Volume (Year): 60 (2005)
Issue (Month): 1 (January)
Pages: 205-218

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Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:60:y:2005:i:1:p:205-218
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