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Pro-cyclical mortality across socioeconomic groups and health status

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  • Haaland, Venke Furre
  • Telle, Kjetil

Abstract

Using variation across geographic regions, a number of studies from the U.S. and other developed countries have found more deaths in economic upturns and less deaths in economic downturns. We use data from regions in Norway for 1977–2008 and find the same pro-cyclical patterns. Using individual-level register data for the identical population, we find that disadvantaged socioeconomic groups are not hit harder by pro-cyclical mortality than advantaged groups. We also find that other indicators of deteriorated health (than death), like becoming disabled, are pro-cyclical. Overall, our analysis suggests that pro-cyclical mortality is rather related to deaths of people already in deteriorated health than to people of low socioeconomic status.

Suggested Citation

  • Haaland, Venke Furre & Telle, Kjetil, 2015. "Pro-cyclical mortality across socioeconomic groups and health status," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 248-258.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:39:y:2015:i:c:p:248-258
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jhealeco.2014.08.005
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:ehbiol:v:28:y:2018:i:c:p:29-37 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Joan Costa-Font & Martin Karlsson & Henning Øien, 2015. "Informal Care and the Great Recession," CINCH Working Paper Series 1502, Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, Competent in Competition and Health, revised Feb 2015.
    3. van den Berg, Gerard J. & Gerdtham, Ulf-G. & von Hinke, Stephanie & Lindeboom, Maarten & Lissdaniels, Johannes & Sundquist, Jan & Sundquist, Kristina, 2017. "Mortality and the business cycle: Evidence from individual and aggregated data," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 61-70.
    4. Colombo, Emilio & Rotondi, Valentina & Stanca, Luca, 2018. "Macroeconomic conditions and health: Inspecting the transmission mechanism," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 29-37.
    5. van den Berg, Gerard J. & Paul, Alexander & Reinhold, Steffen, 2018. "Economic Conditions, Parental Employment and Health of Newborns," IZA Discussion Papers 11338, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    6. Tapia Granados, José A. & Rodriguez, Javier M., 2015. "Health, economic crisis, and austerity: A comparison of Greece, Finland and Iceland," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 119(7), pages 941-953.
    7. Costa-i-Font, Joan & Karlsson, Martin & Øien, Henning, 2016. "Careful in the crisis? Determinants of older people's informal care receipt in crisis-struck European countries," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 66916, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    8. repec:eee:socmed:v:197:y:2018:i:c:p:213-225 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Jofre-Bonet, M. & Serra-Sastre, V. & Vandoros, S., 2016. "Better Health in Times of Hardship?," Working Papers 16/09, Department of Economics, City University London.
    10. Beáta Gavurová & Tatiana Vagašová, 2016. "Regional differences of standardised mortality rates for ischemic heart diseases in the Slovak Republic for the period 1996–2013 in the context of income inequality," Health Economics Review, Springer, vol. 6(1), pages 1-12, December.
    11. Vincenzo Atella & Federico Belotti & Joanna Kopinska & Alessandro Palma & Andrea Piano Mortari, 2018. "Economic Crisis, Mortality and Health Status. A New Perspective," CEIS Research Paper 425, Tor Vergata University, CEIS, revised 20 Feb 2018.
    12. Joan Costa-i-Font & Martin Karlsson & Henning Øien, 2015. "Informal Care and the Great Recession," CESifo Working Paper Series 5427, CESifo Group Munich.
    13. Trude Gunnes & Nina Drange & Kjetil Telle, 2018. "Workload, staff composition, and sickness absence. Findings from employees in child care centers," Discussion Papers 882, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    14. van den Berg, Gerard J. & Paul, Alexander & Reinhold, Steffen, 2018. "Econometric analysis of the effects of economic conditions on the health of newborns," Working Paper Series 2018:24, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    15. repec:eee:ehbiol:v:33:y:2019:i:c:p:193-200 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Mortality; Morbidity; Recession; Unemployment; Business cycle;

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • J6 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers

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