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The Impact of Stock Market Fluctuations on the Mental and Physical Wellbeing of Children

Listed author(s):
  • Chad Cotti

    (University of Wisconsin Oshkosh)

  • David Simon

    (University of Connecticut)

The stock market crash of 2008 caused a severe impact to households. Earlier research has explored the impacts of a stock market crash on life wellbeing, psychological stress, and adult health behaviors. We extend this literature by documenting impacts of stock market fluctuations on a range of child outcomes; including effects on both mental and physical health. We show a negative effect of a market crash on hospitalizations, child reported health status, sick days from school, and emotional difficulties. Both graphical and regression based analysis reveal that our results are not driven by a pre-trend of declining child health before the market crash.

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File URL: http://web2.uconn.edu/economics/working/2016-28.pdf
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Paper provided by University of Connecticut, Department of Economics in its series Working papers with number 2016-28.

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Length: 34 pages
Date of creation: Jun 2016
Handle: RePEc:uct:uconnp:2016-28
Contact details of provider: Postal:
University of Connecticut 365 Fairfield Way, Unit 1063 Storrs, CT 06269-1063

Phone: (860) 486-4889
Fax: (860) 486-4463
Web page: http://www.econ.uconn.edu/

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References listed on IDEAS
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  1. Rajeev Dehejia & Adriana Lleras-Muney, 2004. "Booms, Busts, and Babies' Health," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 119(3), pages 1091-1130.
  2. Gary S. Becker, 2007. "Health as human capital: synthesis and extensions -super-1," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 59(3), pages 379-410, July.
  3. Cotti Chad & Tefft Nathan, 2011. "Decomposing the Relationship between Macroeconomic Conditions and Fatal Car Crashes during the Great Recession: Alcohol- and Non-Alcohol-Related Accidents," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 11(1), pages 1-24, August.
  4. David Simon, 2013. "Does Early Life Exposure to Cigarette Smoke Permanently Harm Childhood Health? Evidence from Cigarette Tax Hikes," Working papers 2013-21, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, revised May 2015.
  5. repec:pri:cheawb:adriana_booms.pdf is not listed on IDEAS
  6. Janet Currie, 2009. "Healthy, Wealthy, and Wise: Socioeconomic Status, Poor Health in Childhood, and Human Capital Development," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 47(1), pages 87-122, March.
  7. Ruhm, Christopher J. & Black, William E., 2002. "Does drinking really decrease in bad times?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 659-678, July.
  8. Ruhm, Christopher J., 1995. "Economic conditions and alcohol problems," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(5), pages 583-603, December.
  9. Chad Cotti & Richard A. Dunn & Nathan Tefft, 2015. "The Dow is Killing Me: Risky Health Behaviors and the Stock Market," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(7), pages 803-821, 07.
  10. Freeman, Donald G., 1999. "A note on 'Economic conditions and alcohol problems'," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(5), pages 659-668, October.
  11. Ettner, Susan L., 1997. "Measuring the human cost of a weak economy: Does unemployment lead to alcohol abuse?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 44(2), pages 251-260, January.
  12. Charles, Kerwin Kofi & DeCicca, Philip, 2008. "Local labor market fluctuations and health: Is there a connection and for whom?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(6), pages 1532-1550, December.
  13. Niclas Kruger & Mikael Svensson, 2010. "Good times are drinking times: empirical evidence on business cycles and alcohol sales in Sweden 1861-2000," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(6), pages 543-546.
  14. Jeremy Arkes, 2007. "Does the economy affect teenage substance use?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(1), pages 19-36.
  15. repec:pri:cheawb:adriana_booms is not listed on IDEAS
  16. Marianne Page & Jessamyn Schaller & David Simon, 2016. "The Effects of Aggregate and Gender-Specific Labor Demand Shocks on Child Health," NBER Working Papers 22394, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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