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Aggregation and the estimated effects of economic conditions on health

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  • Lindo, Jason M.

Abstract

This paper considers the relationship between economic conditions and health with a focus on different approaches to geographic aggregation. After reviewing the tradeoffs associated with more- and less-disaggregated analyses, I update earlier state-level analyses of mortality and infant health and then consider how the estimated effects vary when the analysis is conducted at differing levels of geographic aggregation. This analysis reveals that the results are sensitive to the level of geographic aggregation with more-disaggregated analyses—particularly county-level analyses—routinely producing estimates that are smaller in magnitude. Further analyses suggest this is due to spillover effects of economic conditions on health outcomes across counties.

Suggested Citation

  • Lindo, Jason M., 2015. "Aggregation and the estimated effects of economic conditions on health," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 83-96.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:40:y:2015:i:c:p:83-96
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jhealeco.2014.11.009
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Economic conditions and the health of babies. You won’t believe what the literature says!
      by Sam Watson in The Academic Health Economists' Blog on 2016-06-30 11:30:01

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:ehbiol:v:28:y:2018:i:c:p:29-37 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. van den Berg, Gerard J. & Gerdtham, Ulf-G. & von Hinke, Stephanie & Lindeboom, Maarten & Lissdaniels, Johannes & Sundquist, Jan & Sundquist, Kristina, 2017. "Mortality and the business cycle: Evidence from individual and aggregated data," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 61-70.
    3. Wang, Huixia & Wang, Chenggang & Halliday, Timothy J., 2018. "Health and health inequality during the great recession: Evidence from the PSID," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 17-30.
    4. David M. Cutler & Wei Huang & Adriana Lleras-Muney, 2016. "Economic Conditions and Mortality: Evidence from 200 Years of Data," NBER Working Papers 22690, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Colombo, Emilio & Rotondi, Valentina & Stanca, Luca, 2018. "Macroeconomic conditions and health: Inspecting the transmission mechanism," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 29-37.
    6. Vellore Arthi & Brian Beach & W. Walker Hanlon, 2017. "Estimating the Recession-Mortality Relationship when Migration Matters," NBER Working Papers 23507, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Chenggang Wang & Huixia Wang & Timothy J. Halliday, 2017. "Health and Health Inequality during the Great Recession: Evidence from the PSID," Working Papers 201703, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Economics.
    8. repec:eee:jhecon:v:56:y:2017:i:c:p:222-233 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Josselin Thuilliez, 2016. "'Recessions, healthy no more?': A note on Recessions, Gender and Mortality in France," Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne 16008, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1), Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne.
    10. repec:eee:socmed:v:189:y:2017:i:c:p:11-16 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. repec:kap:reveho:v:15:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s11150-017-9368-y is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Ezra Golberstein & Gilbert Gonzales & Ellen Meara, 2016. "Economic Conditions and Children's Mental Health," NBER Working Papers 22459, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Sameem, Sediq & Sylwester, Kevin, 2017. "The business cycle and mortality: Urban versus rural counties," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 175(C), pages 28-35.
    14. Andrew Foote & Michel Grosz & Ann Stevens, 2015. "Locate Your Nearest Exit: Mass Layoffs and Local Labor Market Response," Working Papers 15-25, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    15. Hollingsworth, Alex & Ruhm, Christopher J. & Simon, Kosali, 2017. "Macroeconomic conditions and opioid abuse," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 222-233.
    16. Borra, Cristina & Pons-Pons, Jeronia & Vilar-Rodriguez, Margarita, 2017. "Austerity, health care provision, and health outcomes in Spain," MPRA Paper 79736, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    17. repec:hal:journl:halshs-01278019 is not listed on IDEAS
    18. Carpenter, Christopher S. & McClellan, Chandler B. & Rees, Daniel I., 2017. "Economic conditions, illicit drug use, and substance use disorders in the United States," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 63-73.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Health; Recessions; Mortality; Infant health; Aggregation;

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • J20 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - General
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles

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