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Why Are Recessions Good for Your Health?

Author

Listed:
  • Douglas L. Miller
  • Marianne E. Page
  • Ann Huff Stevens
  • Mateusz Filipski

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Douglas L. Miller & Marianne E. Page & Ann Huff Stevens & Mateusz Filipski, 2009. "Why Are Recessions Good for Your Health?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(2), pages 122-127, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:99:y:2009:i:2:p:122-27
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/aer.99.2.122
    as

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    File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/aer.99.2.122
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Daniel G. Sullivan & Till von Wachter, 2006. "Mortality, mass-layoffs, and career outcomes: an analysis using administrative data," Working Paper Series WP-06-21, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
    2. Christopher J. Ruhm, 2000. "Are Recessions Good for Your Health?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 115(2), pages 617-650.
    3. Miller, Douglas L. & Paxson, Christina, 2006. "Relative income, race, and mortality," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(5), pages 979-1003, September.
    4. Ruhm, Christopher J., 2003. "Good times make you sick," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 637-658, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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