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Do not go breaking your heart: Do economic upturns really increase heart attack mortality?

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  • Svensson, Mikael

Abstract

Several recent papers in the literature have documented a pro-cyclical effect between business cycles and mortality. In this paper, I explore the relationship between business cycles and incidence, mortality and lethality in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in Sweden. The sample consists of 21 Swedish regions during the period 1987-2003. Results from the panel data estimations indicate that the business cycle effect is insignificant on overall rates of incidence, mortality and lethality. However, a counter-cyclical and significant effect is found in most specifications for those in prime working age between 20 and 49. Hence, previous recent results from the literature cannot be taken as universal for other countries or settings. It is also shown that a higher share of women, highly educated and non-foreigners decrease incidence and mortality.

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  • Svensson, Mikael, 2007. "Do not go breaking your heart: Do economic upturns really increase heart attack mortality?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 65(4), pages 833-841, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:65:y:2007:i:4:p:833-841
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    Cited by:

    1. Richard Layte & Anne Nolan, 2016. "Socio-economic Differentials in Male Mortality in Ireland 1984-2008," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 47(3), pages 361-390.
    2. repec:eee:ehbiol:v:28:y:2018:i:c:p:29-37 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. repec:dem:demres:v:37:y:2017:i:25 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Thorhildur Ólafsdóttir & Birgir Hrafnkelsson & Tinna Ásgeirsdóttir, 2015. "The Icelandic economic collapse, smoking, and the role of labor-market changes," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 16(4), pages 391-405, May.
    5. Christopher J. Ruhm, 2015. "Health Effects of Economic Crises," NBER Working Papers 21604, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Ruhm, Christopher J., 2015. "Recessions, healthy no more?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 17-28.
    7. Edwards, Ryan, 2008. "Who is hurt by procyclical mortality?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 67(12), pages 2051-2058, December.
    8. Halliday, Timothy J., 2014. "Unemployment and mortality: Evidence from the PSID," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 113(C), pages 15-22.
    9. van den Berg, Gerard J. & Gerdtham, Ulf-G. & von Hinke, Stephanie & Lindeboom, Maarten & Lissdaniels, Johannes & Sundquist, Jan & Sundquist, Kristina, 2017. "Mortality and the business cycle: Evidence from individual and aggregated data," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 61-70.
    10. Niclas Kruger & Mikael Svensson, 2010. "Good times are drinking times: empirical evidence on business cycles and alcohol sales in Sweden 1861-2000," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(6), pages 543-546.
    11. Colombo, Emilio & Rotondi, Valentina & Stanca, Luca, 2018. "Macroeconomic conditions and health: Inspecting the transmission mechanism," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 29-37.
    12. Ólafsdóttir, Thorhildur & Hrafnkelsson, Birgir & Thorgeirsson, Gudmundur & Ásgeirsdóttir, Tinna Laufey, 2016. "The tax-free year in Iceland: A natural experiment to explore the impact of a short-term increase in labor supply on the risk of heart attacks," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 14-27.
    13. Andrea Menclova, 2013. "The Effects of Unemployment on Prenatal Care Use and Infant Health," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 34(4), pages 400-420, December.
    14. Vellore Arthi & Brian Beach & W. Walker Hanlon, 2017. "Estimating the Recession-Mortality Relationship when Migration Matters," NBER Working Papers 23507, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    15. Thorhildur Ólafsdóttir & Tinna Ásgeirsdóttir, 2015. "Gender differences in drinking behavior during an economic collapse: evidence from Iceland," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 13(4), pages 975-1001, December.
    16. Xu, Xin, 2013. "The business cycle and health behaviors," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 126-136.
    17. Nizalova, Olena Y. & Norton, Edward C., 2017. "Long-Run Effects of Severe Economic Recessions on Male BMI Trajectories and Health Behaviors," IZA Discussion Papers 10776, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    18. Bonamore, Giorgio & Carmignani, Fabrizio & Colombo, Emilio, 2015. "Addressing the unemployment–mortality conundrum: Non-linearity is the answer," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 126(C), pages 67-72.
    19. Lindo, Jason M., 2013. "Aggregation and the Estimated Effects of Local Economic Conditions on Health," IZA Discussion Papers 7396, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    20. repec:eee:socmed:v:197:y:2018:i:c:p:213-225 is not listed on IDEAS
    21. José Tapia granados, 2008. "Macroeconomic fluctuations and mortality in postwar Japan," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 45(2), pages 323-343, May.
    22. Tapia Granados, José A., 2012. "Economic growth and health progress in England and Wales: 160 years of a changing relation," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 74(5), pages 688-695.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Sweden Heart attacks Mortality Incidence Business cycles Economics;

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior

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