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The Time-crunch Paradox

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  • Almudena Sevilla-Sanz
  • Jose Ignacio Gimenez-Nadal

Abstract

Previous research has shown little difference in the average leisure time of men and women. This finding is a challenge to the second shift argument, which suggests that increases in female labor market hours have not been compensated by equal decreases in household labor. This paper presents time-use and leisure satisfaction data for a variety of western European countries, and shows that accounting for individual heterogeneity is vital for understanding gender differences. In particular, working mothers have leisure levels that are much lower than those of working fathers and singles. Working mothers are also most likely to report the least satisfaction with free time. Finding that time stress and leisure time are positively correlated within socio-demographic groups suggests that the second shift argument is still valid, and that feelings of time stress are indeed associated with the lack of leisure time.

Suggested Citation

  • Almudena Sevilla-Sanz & Jose Ignacio Gimenez-Nadal, 2010. "The Time-crunch Paradox," Economics Series Working Papers 483, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:oxf:wpaper:483
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Gimenez-Nadal, J. Ignacio & Molina, Jose Alberto, 2015. "Health status and the allocation of time: Cross-country evidence from Europe," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 188-203.
    2. repec:eee:jotrge:v:66:y:2018:i:c:p:19-29 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. José Ignacio Gimenez-Nadal & José Alberto Molina & Raquel Ortega, 2010. "Unemployment and Time Use: Evidence from the Spanish Time Use Survey," Documentos de Trabajo dt2010-02, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales, Universidad de Zaragoza.
    4. Elisabetta Lazzaro & Carlofilippo Frateschi, 2017. "Couples’ arts participation: assessing individual and joint time use," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 41(1), pages 47-69, February.
    5. repec:kap:jfamec:v:38:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s10834-017-9534-7 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. repec:spr:soinre:v:135:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s11205-016-1489-9 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Gimenez-Nadal, J. Ignacio & Molina, José Alberto & Velilla, Jorge, 2018. "Telework, the Timing of Work, and Instantaneous Well-Being: Evidence from Time Use Data," IZA Discussion Papers 11271, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Gimenez-Nadal, J. Ignacio & Molina, José Alberto & Velilla, Jorge, 2018. "Commuting Time and Sick-Day Absence of US Workers," IZA Discussion Papers 11700, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    9. Begoña Álvarez & Daniel Miles-Touya, 2016. "Time Allocation and Women’s Life Satisfaction: Evidence from Spain," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 129(3), pages 1207-1230, December.
    10. J. Gimenez-Nadal & Jose Molina, 2014. "Regional unemployment, gender, and time allocation of the unemployed," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 105-127, March.
    11. Juan Carlos, Campaña & J. Ignacio, Giménez-Nadal & Jose Alberto, Molina, 2017. "Differences between self-employed and employed mothers in balancing family and work responsibilities: Evidence from Latin American countries," MPRA Paper 77964, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. J. Gimenez-Nadal & Jose Molina, 2013. "Parents’ education as a determinant of educational childcare time," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 26(2), pages 719-749, April.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Second shift; Work-life balance; Time use; Leisure satisfaction;

    JEL classification:

    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation
    • D14 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Saving; Personal Finance
    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • J12 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

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