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Changes in quantity and quality of time for children: United States, 1981-1997

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Abstract

This paper tries to analyze changes in the allocation of time decided by mothers and how different characteristics of them, such us marital status, employment status, etc., influences that allocation across the period 1981-1997 in the United States. Data reveals that there exists an increase on the quantity and quality of time devoted to children by some types of mothers and children. It is shown that the behavioral component of this change is larger than the structural component. Then, the determinants of direct and indirect time, quality versus quantity, are analyzed in a simultaneous equation framework. Estimations suggest that if a mother works, children's time is reduced. However working time is a substitutes of quantity of time with children, but not quality. Being single reduces not only time but its quality. Mother's earnings and level of education have changed their influence on the allocation of time across time.

Suggested Citation

  • Ana I. Moro-Egido, 2005. "Changes in quantity and quality of time for children: United States, 1981-1997," Economic Working Papers at Centro de Estudios Andaluces E2005/18, Centro de Estudios Andaluces.
  • Handle: RePEc:cea:doctra:e2005_18
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    1. Leibowitz, Arleen, 1974. "Education and Home Production," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 64(2), pages 243-250, May.
    2. Keane, Michael P & Wolpin, Kenneth I, 2001. "The Effect of Parental Transfers and Borrowing Constraints on Educational Attainment," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 42(4), pages 1051-1103, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ana Moro-Egido, 2012. "Changing Trends of Mothers’ Active and Passive Childcare Times," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 33(1), pages 11-23, March.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Time-use; quantity and quality of time with children; family ecomics; simultaneous equation system; three-stage least squares;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J12 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J20 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - General

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