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Child Care Choices by Italian Households

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  • Del Boca, Daniela

    () (University of Turin)

  • Locatelli, Marilena

    () (University of Turin)

  • Vuri, Daniela

    () (University of Rome Tor Vergata)

Abstract

In spite of relatively generous public subsidies and a reputation for high quality, only a very limited proportion of Italian families use public child care. In this paper we explore the significance of various factors on the choices made between different types of child care. In part one, we use a simulation exercise to show the impact of cost and availability on child care choices. In part two, we present the results of an explorative econometric analysis using a matched data set for 1998 from the Bank of Italy (SHIW) and ISTAT Multiscopo. We find evidence that factors related to family composition and support as well as to the characteristics of child care are important in explaining the choices made by Italian families. Assistance provided by grandmothers and husbands appears to be of crucial significance to Italian mothers who are seeking to reconcile the difficulties stemming from the rigidity of the labor market and the limitations of child care. Rationing, both of public and private child care, also proves to be an important factor affecting households’ choices. An understanding of the importance of these factors is relevant in the evaluation of social policies encouraging mothers’ participation in the labor market in Italy.

Suggested Citation

  • Del Boca, Daniela & Locatelli, Marilena & Vuri, Daniela, 2004. "Child Care Choices by Italian Households," IZA Discussion Papers 983, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp983
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    Cited by:

    1. Daniela Del Boca & Silvia Pasqua & Chiara Pronzato, 2004. "Employment and Fertility Decisions in Italy, France and the U.K," CHILD Working Papers wp08_04, CHILD - Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic economics - ITALY.
    2. Tom Kornstad & Thor Thoresen, 2007. "A discrete choice model for labor supply and childcare," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 20(4), pages 781-803, October.
    3. Daniela Del Boca & Daniela Vuri, 2007. "The mismatch between employment and child care in Italy: the impact of rationing," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 20(4), pages 805-832, October.
    4. Junyi Zhang & Lili Xu & Akimasa Fujiwara, 2012. "Developing an integrated scobit-based activity participation and time allocation model to explore influence of childcare on women’s time use behaviour," Transportation, Springer, vol. 39(1), pages 125-149, January.
    5. Katharina Wrohlich, 2008. "The excess demand for subsidized child care in Germany," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(10), pages 1217-1228.
    6. Wrohlich, Katharina, 2006. "Labor Supply and Child Care Choices in a Rationed Child Care Market," IZA Discussion Papers 2053, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Simone Salotti, 2012. "Wealth Effects in the US: Evidence from the Combination of Two Surveys," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 43(1), pages 67-98.
    8. Concetta Rondinelli & Roberta Zizza, 2010. "(Non)persistent effects of fertility on female labour supply," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 783, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    9. Jérôme De Henau & Danièle Meulders & Sile Padraigin O'Dorchai & Hélène Périvier, 2004. "The relative generosity of the EU-15 members states' child policies," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/9293, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    10. Simon, Silvia, 2008. "Vertikale Segregation zwischen Frauen und Männern - Ein Thema auch für Liechtenstein," Arbeitspapiere 18, Liechtenstein-Institut.
    11. Arpino, Bruno & Pronzato, Chiara & Tavares, Lara Patrício, 2010. "All in the family: informal childcare and mothers' labour market participation," ISER Working Paper Series 2010-24, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    12. Simone Salotti, 2010. "An appraisal of the wealth effect in the US: evidence from pseudo-panel data," Working Papers - Mathematical Economics 2010-06, Universita' degli Studi di Firenze, Dipartimento di Scienze per l'Economia e l'Impresa.
    13. Del Boca Daniela, 2010. "Child Poverty and Child Well-Being in Italy," Department of Economics and Statistics Cognetti de Martiis. Working Papers 201001, University of Turin.
    14. Y.E. Akgündüz & J. Plantenga, 2011. "Child Care Prices and Female Labour Force Participation: A Meta-Analysis," Working Papers 11-08, Utrecht School of Economics.
    15. Ildefonso Méndez, 2008. "Intergenerational Time Transfers And Internal Migration: Accounting For Low Spatial Mobility In Southern Europe," Working Papers wp2008_0811, CEMFI.
    16. Josefina Posadas, 2012. "Grandparents as Child Care Providers : Factors to Consider When Designing Child Care Policies," World Bank Other Operational Studies 17056, The World Bank.
    17. Daniela Del Boca & Daniela Vuri, 2005. "Labor Supply and Child Care Costs: The Effect of Rationing," Labor and Demography 0510016, EconWPA.
    18. Del Boca, Daniela & Pasqua, Silvia & Pronzato, Chiara D., 2004. "Why Are Fertility and Women's Employment Rates So Low in Italy? Lessons from France and the U.K," IZA Discussion Papers 1274, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    19. Jérôme De Henau & Danièle Meulders & Sile Padraigin O'Dorchai, 2006. "The comparative effectiveness of public policies to fight motherhood-induced employment penalties and decreasing fertility in the former EU-15," DULBEA Working Papers 0026, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    20. Mendez, Ildefonso, 2008. "Intergenerational Time Transfers and Internal Migration: Accounting for Low Spatial Mobility in Southern Europe," MPRA Paper 8654, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    21. Cristina Borra Marcos, 2006. "Female labour participation and child care choices in Spain," Economic Working Papers at Centro de Estudios Andaluces E2006/16, Centro de Estudios Andaluces.
    22. J. Gimenez-Nadal & Jose Molina, 2013. "Parents’ education as a determinant of educational childcare time," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 26(2), pages 719-749, April.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    child care; labor market decisions;

    JEL classification:

    • J2 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor
    • C3 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables
    • D1 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior

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