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Employment of Mothers after Childbirth : A French-German Comparison

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  • Ch. LAUER
  • A.M. WEBER

Abstract

This paper compares the work attachment of French and German women after childbirth. Both fertility and employment of mothers are higher in France than in Germany. Since the sample of mothers deciding on employment after a child is born might not be representative for all women, we take account of selectivity by explicitly modelling the childbirth decision of women. Furthermore, it proved essential to distinguish between part-time and full-time employment. Background characteristics appear to affect both the birth and the employment decisions in a different way in France and Germany. Some of the impacts can be related to different family policy regulations.
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Suggested Citation

  • Ch. LAUER & A.M. WEBER, 2003. "Employment of Mothers after Childbirth : A French-German Comparison," Working Papers ERMES 0309, ERMES, University Paris 2.
  • Handle: RePEc:erm:papers:0309
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    File URL: http://www.u-paris2.fr/ermes/doctrav/trav0309
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Hotz, V Joseph & Miller, Robert A, 1988. "An Empirical Analysis of Life Cycle Fertility and Female Labor Supply," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 56(1), pages 91-118, January.
    2. Massimiliano Bratti, 2003. "Labour force participation and marital fertility of Italian women: The role of education," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 16(3), pages 525-554, August.
    3. Pedro Mira & Namkee Ahn, 2002. "A note on the changing relationship between fertility and female employment rates in developed countries," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 15(4), pages 667-682.
    4. Jan Ondrich & C. Spiess & Qing Yang & Gert Wagner, 2003. "The Liberalization of Maternity Leave Policy and the Return to Work after Childbirth in Germany," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 1(1), pages 77-110, January.
    5. Ermisch, John F, 1988. "Purchased Child Care, Optimal Family Size and Mother's Employment," CEPR Discussion Papers 238, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    6. Joyce P. Jacobsen & James Wishart Pearce III & Joshua L. Rosenbloom, 1999. "The Effects of Childbearing on Married Women's Labor Supply and Earnings: Using Twin Births as a Natural Experiment," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 34(3), pages 449-474.
    7. Hotz, V-J & Kerman, J-A & Willis, R-J, 1996. "The Economics of Fertility in Developed Countries : A Survey," Papers 96-09, RAND - Labor and Population Program.
    8. Guy Laroque & Bernard Salanié, 2004. "Fertility and Financial Incentives in France," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 50(3), pages 423-450.
    9. repec:eme:rlepps:v:18:y:1999:i:1999:p:41-74 is not listed on IDEAS
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:spo:wpecon:info:hdl:2441/5l6uh8ogmqildh09h52b770qm is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Lauer, Charlotte, 2004. "Education, Gender and Earnings in France and Germany: Level and Dispersion Effects," ZEW Discussion Papers 04-54, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    3. Christian Dudel, 2009. "The Demographic Dilemma: Fertility, Female Labor Force Participation and Future Growth in Germany 2007-2060," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 158, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    4. Françoise Milewski, 2004. "Femmes : « top » modèles des inégalités," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/5l6uh8ogmqi, Sciences Po.
    5. Katharina Wrohlich, 2008. "The excess demand for subsidized child care in Germany," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(10), pages 1217-1228.
    6. Hiller, Victor & Baudin, Thomas, 2016. "Cultural transmission and the evolution of gender roles," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 84(C), pages 8-23.
    7. Katrin Sommerfeld, 2009. "Older Babies - More Active Mothers? How Maternal Labor Supply Changes as the Child Grows," Schmollers Jahrbuch : Journal of Applied Social Science Studies / Zeitschrift für Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften, Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, vol. 129(2), pages 227-240.
    8. Weber, Andrea Maria, 2004. "Wann kehren junge Mütter auf den Arbeitsmarkt zurück? Eine Verweildaueranalyse für Deutschland," ZEW Discussion Papers 04-08, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    9. Reich, Nora, 2008. "Das Bundeselterngeld- und Elternzeitgesetz in Deutschland: Analyse potenzieller Effekte auf Geburtenzahl und Fertilitätsstruktur," HWWI Policy Papers 1-10, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWI).
    10. Françoise Milewski, 2004. "Femmes : " top " modèles des inégalités," Post-Print hal-01020111, HAL.
    11. Dorothea Alewell & Kerstin Pull, 2005. "Die Neugestaltung der Finanzierung des Mutterschutzes - ein Kommentar zum Mutterschutz-Urteil des Bundesverfassungsgerichtes," ifo Schnelldienst, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 58(04), pages 22-27, February.
    12. Christina Felfe, 2009. "The Willingness to Pay for Job Amenities: Evidence from Mothers' Return to Work," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 247, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    13. Thomas Baudin, 2015. "Religion and fertility: The French connection," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 32(13), pages 397-420, February.
    14. Djurdjevic, Dragana, 2005. "Women's Labour Supply after Childbirth: An Empirical Analysis for Switzerland," Darmstadt Discussion Papers in Economics 144, Darmstadt University of Technology, Department of Law and Economics.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D1 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior
    • J2 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor

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