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Women's Labour Supply after Childbirth: An Empirical Analysis for Switzerland

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  • Djurdjevic, Dragana

Abstract

In this paper, I investigate employment behaviour of women one year after childbirth. Since the study is based on a sample of mothers only, a corrective method for selection into motherhood has been applied. In the empirical work, I use the family sex composition as an instrument for fertility. The primary focus of this study is to investigate the regional differences in the labour supply of women after childbirth. In Switzerland, childcare policy is an area being the responsibility of cantons and communes. There are thus considerable geographical, linguistic and cultural differences in childcare provision within the country. For instance, childcare policy is more strongly integrated at the cantonal level in the French and Italian speaking regions ('Latin part') than in the German speaking regions ('German part') where communes operate at their own discretion. The federal structure of Switzerland poses thus issues of policy coherence. The main results of this paper indicate that Latin mothers are more likely to return to work and to report more hours of work than their German counterparts. As a consequence, a more coherent and more harmonised childcare policy at the federal level should prove worthwhile. Adopting measures that increase the availability and the quality of childcare is important to promote mother's full-time and continuous employment.

Suggested Citation

  • Djurdjevic, Dragana, 2005. "Women's Labour Supply after Childbirth: An Empirical Analysis for Switzerland," Darmstadt Discussion Papers in Economics 144, Darmstadt University of Technology, Department of Law and Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:darddp:dar_37208
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Blagica Petreski & Marjan Petreski, 2018. "Analysis of the public spending on education and on social protection of children in the country," Finance Think Policy Studies 2018-12/20, Finance Think - Economic Research and Policy Institute.
    2. Katja Coneus & Kathrin Göggel & Grit Muehler, 2007. "Determinants of Child Care Participation," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 72, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    3. Katrin Sommerfeld, 2009. "Older Babies - More Active Mothers? How Maternal Labor Supply Changes as the Child Grows," Schmollers Jahrbuch : Journal of Applied Social Science Studies / Zeitschrift für Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften, Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, vol. 129(2), pages 227-240.
    4. Margit Schratzenstaller, 2014. "Familienpolitik in ausgewählten europäischen Ländern im Vergleich," WIFO Studies, WIFO, number 50840, September.
    5. Monika Bütler, 2007. "Arbeiten lohnt sich nicht – ein zweites Kind noch weniger. Zu den Auswirkungen einkommensabhängiger Tarife auf das (Arbeitsmarkt‐) Verhalten der Frauen," Perspektiven der Wirtschaftspolitik, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 8(1), pages 1-19, January.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    fertility; labour supply; selectivity; instrumental variables;

    JEL classification:

    • D1 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure

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