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Older Babies - More Active Mothers?: How Maternal Labor Supply Changes as the Child Grows

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  • Katrin Sommerfeld

Abstract

Female labor market activity is dependent on the presence and the age of a child, but how do the determinants develop in magnitude and significance with the child's age? Using German SOEP data from 1991 to 2006 for mothers with young children, the change in maternal labor supply when the child is one, two, and three years old is explicitly addressed. According to the tobit regression results for precise working hours, maternal labor supply becomes increasingly responsive to economic incentives - mainly to imputed wages - as the child grows.

Suggested Citation

  • Katrin Sommerfeld, 2008. "Older Babies - More Active Mothers?: How Maternal Labor Supply Changes as the Child Grows," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 143, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  • Handle: RePEc:diw:diwsop:diw_sp143
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    Cited by:

    1. Jan Marcus & Frauke H. Peter, 2015. "Maternal Labour Supply and All-Day Primary Schools in Germany," DIW Roundup: Politik im Fokus 67, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    2. Fitzenberger, Bernd & Sommerfeld, Katrin & Steffes, Susanne, 2013. "Causal effects on employment after first birth — A dynamic treatment approach," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(C), pages 49-62.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Female labor supply; childbirth; parental leave;

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation

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