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Children and Women's Participation Dynamics: Transitory and Long-Term Effects

Author

Listed:
  • Voicu, Alexandru

    () (CUNY - College of Staten Island)

  • Buddelmeyer, Hielke

    () (Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research)

Abstract

Children affect the after-birth labor force participation of women in two ways. Directly, the time spent in child-care reduces the labor market effort. The time spent out of the labor market while on maternity leave alters women's participation experience and, thus, indirectly affects subsequent participation behavior. This paper proposes a model that disentangles the direct and indirect effect of children on women's labor force participation, and evaluates their relative importance. Participation decisions on a three-state space - employed full-time, employed part-time, not employed - are represented by a multivariate probit model with a general correlation structure. The model allows for a high degree of flexibility in modeling the dependence of sequential decisions. The estimation is performed using Markov chain Monte Carlo methods. It is shown that the indirect effect, through time out of the labor market, is more important. The discrepancy is sharper for full-time employment and grows with the length of the interruption.

Suggested Citation

  • Voicu, Alexandru & Buddelmeyer, Hielke, 2003. "Children and Women's Participation Dynamics: Transitory and Long-Term Effects," IZA Discussion Papers 729, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp729
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Geweke, John, 1989. "Bayesian Inference in Econometric Models Using Monte Carlo Integration," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 57(6), pages 1317-1339, November.
    2. Keane, Michael P, 1994. "A Computationally Practical Simulation Estimator for Panel Data," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 62(1), pages 95-116, January.
    3. Boeri, Tito & Flinn, Christopher J., 1999. "Returns to Mobility in the Transition to a Market Economy," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 4-32, March.
    4. Becker, Gary S, 1985. "Human Capital, Effort, and the Sexual Division of Labor," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 3(1), pages 33-58, January.
    5. Francine D. Blau & Marianne A. Ferber, 1991. "Career Plans and Expectations of Young Women and Men: The Earnings Gap and Labor Force Participation," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 26(4), pages 581-607.
    6. Shorrocks, A F, 1978. "The Measurement of Mobility," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(5), pages 1013-1024, September.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. World Bank, 2007. "Chile - County Gender Assessment : Expanding Women's Work Choices to Enhance Chile's Economic Potential," World Bank Other Operational Studies 7639, The World Bank.
    2. Johannes Geyer & Viktor Steiner, 2007. "Short-Run and Long-Term Effects of Childbirth on Mothers' Employment and Working Hours across Institutional Regimes: An Empirical Analysis Based on the European Community Household Panel," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 682, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    3. Katrin Sommerfeld, 2009. "Older Babies - More Active Mothers? How Maternal Labor Supply Changes as the Child Grows," Schmollers Jahrbuch : Journal of Applied Social Science Studies / Zeitschrift für Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften, Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, vol. 129(2), pages 227-240.
    4. Elena Bardasi & Chiara Monfardini, 2004. "Women's Employment, Children and Transition: An Empirical Analysis on Poland," Eastward Enlargement of the Euro-zone Working Papers wp25, Free University Berlin, Jean Monnet Centre of Excellence, revised 15 Oct 2004.
    5. Colm Harmon & Claire Finn & Arnaud Chevalier & Tarja Viitanen, 2006. "The economics of early childhood care and education : technical research paper for the National Economic and Social Forum," Open Access publications 10197/671, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
    6. Kristian Orsini & Antje Mertens & Felix Büchel, 2003. "Is Mothers Employment an Effective Means to Fight Family Poverty? Empirical Evidence from Seven European Countries," LIS Working papers 363, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
    7. Michaud, Pierre-Carl & Tatsiramos, Konstantinos, 2005. "Employment Dynamics of Married Women in Europe," IZA Discussion Papers 1706, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Troske, Kenneth R. & Voicu, Alexandru, 2010. "Joint estimation of sequential labor force participation and fertility decisions using Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 150-169, January.
    9. Michaud, Pierre-Carl & Tatsiramos, Konstantinos, 2005. "Employment Dynamics of Married Women in Europe," IZA Discussion Papers 1706, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    female labor supply; multivariate probit model; Gibbs sampler;

    JEL classification:

    • C11 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Bayesian Analysis: General
    • C15 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Statistical Simulation Methods: General
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply

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