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Employment Dynamics in the Romanian Labor Market: A Markov Chain Monte Carlo Approach

  • Voicu, Alexandru


    (CUNY - College of Staten Island)

We use micro data from the Romanian Labor Force Survey to analyze the effect of the restructuring process on the employment dynamics of urban residents in the Romanian labor market. We analyze the way personal characteristics influence individuals’ ability to adjust to labor market transformations. Sequential employment decisions made by individuals are modeled as Markov decision processes. The resulting multivariate probit models are estimated using Markov Chain Monte Carlo techniques.

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Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 438.

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Length: 40 pages
Date of creation: Feb 2002
Date of revision:
Publication status: published in: Journal of Comparative Economics, 2005, 33 (3), 604-639
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp438
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  1. Mark C. Foley, 1997. "Determinants of Unemployment Duration in Russia," Working Papers 779, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
  2. Shorrocks, A F, 1978. "The Measurement of Mobility," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(5), pages 1013-24, September.
  3. Vit Sorm & Katherine Terrell, 1999. "Sectoral Restructuring and Labor Mobility: A Comparative Look at the Czech Republic," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 273, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  4. John Micklewright & Gyula Nagy, 1997. "The Implications of Exhausting Unemployment Insurance Entitlement in Hungary," Papers iopeps97/8, Innocenti Occasional Papers, Economic Policy Series.
  5. Keane, Michael P, 1994. "A Computationally Practical Simulation Estimator for Panel Data," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 62(1), pages 95-116, January.
  6. Foley, M.C., 1997. "Determinants of Unemployment Duration in Russia," Papers 779, Yale - Economic Growth Center.
  7. L Bellmann & S Estrin & H Lehmann & Jonathan Wadsworth, 1992. "The Eastern German Labour Market in Transition: Gross Flow Estimates from Panel Data," CEP Discussion Papers dp0102, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  8. Tito Boeri & Katherine Terrell, 2001. "Institutional Determinants of Labor Reallocation in Transition," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 384, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  9. Tito Boeri & Christopher J. Flinn, . "Returns to Mobility in the Transition to a Market Economy," Working Papers 123, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.
  10. Faggio, Giulia & Konings, Jozef, 2003. "Job creation, job destruction and employment growth in transition countries in the 90s," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 129-154, June.
  11. Svejnar, Jan, 1999. "Labor markets in the transitional Central and East European economies," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 42, pages 2809-2857 Elsevier.
  12. Mark C. Foley, 1997. "Determinants of Unemployment Duration in Russia," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 81, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  13. Alexandru Voicu, 2002. "Labor Force Participation Dynamics in the Romanian Labor Market," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 481, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  14. Micklewright, John & Nagy, Gyula, 1995. "Unemployment Insurance and Incentives in Hungary," CEPR Discussion Papers 1118, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  15. Catalin Pauna & John S. Earle, 1998. "Long-term unemployment, social assistance and labor market policies in Romania," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 23(1/2), pages 203-235.
  16. Ham, John C & Svejnar, Jan & Terrell, Katherine, 1998. "Unemployment and the Social Safety Net during Transitions to a Market Economy: Evidence from the Czech and Slovak Republics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(5), pages 1117-42, December.
  17. Valentijn Bilsen & Jozef Konings, 1997. "Job Creation, Job Destruction and Growth of Newly Established, Privatized and State-Owned Enterprises in Transition Economies: Survey Evidence from Bulgaria, Hungary and Romania," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 106, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  18. Geweke, John, 1989. "Bayesian Inference in Econometric Models Using Monte Carlo Integration," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 57(6), pages 1317-39, November.
  19. John S. Earle, 1997. "Industrial Decline and Labor Reallocation in Romania," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 118, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
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