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Does Labour Market Achievement Matter for the Wellbeing of Australian Immigrants? Culture and Gender Differences

Author

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  • Weiping Kostenko

    (Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne)

Abstract

This study explores the Australian immigrants' job-life relationship by simultaneously estimating a bivariate ordered probit random effects panel model. We found that discrepancy between career goal and employment reality plays a central role. The study also explores the characteristics related to immigrants who are likely to have stronger job concerns. Non-western male immigrants are among them. They are more disadvantaged in the labour market and have lower life satisfaction compared to their Western counterparts, while these situations improve with duration in Australia. Also, immigration age is found crucial for this adjustment process. For female immigrants, the results suggest that the well-educated female migrants' subjective wellbeing is impeded by struggling over work-family balance.

Suggested Citation

  • Weiping Kostenko, 2009. "Does Labour Market Achievement Matter for the Wellbeing of Australian Immigrants? Culture and Gender Differences," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2009n21, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  • Handle: RePEc:iae:iaewps:wp2009n21
    as

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    File URL: http://melbourneinstitute.unimelb.edu.au/downloads/working_paper_series/wp2009n21.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Immigrant; wellbeing; labour market outcomes; endogeneity; bivariate ordered probit random effects panel model;

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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