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Heterogeneity in the Relationship between Unemployment and Subjective Well-Being: A Quantile Approach

  • Martin Binder
  • Alex Coad

Unemployment has been robustly shown to strongly decrease subjective well-being (or "happiness"). In the present paper, we use panel quantile regression techniques in order to analyze to what extent the negative impact of unemployment varies along the subjective well-being distribution. In our analysis of British Household Panel Survey data (1996-2008) we find that, over the quantiles of our subjective well-being variable, individuals with high well-being suffer less from becoming unemployed. A similar but stronger effect of unemployment is found for a broad mental well-being variable (GHQ-12). For happy and mentally stable individuals, it seems their higher well-being acts like a safety net when they become unemployed. We explore these findings by examining the heterogeneous unemployment effects over the quantiles of satisfaction with various life domains.

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Paper provided by Levy Economics Institute in its series Economics Working Paper Archive with number wp_808.

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Date of creation: Jun 2014
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Handle: RePEc:lev:wrkpap:wp_808
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