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Social Deprivation and Exclusion of Immigrants in Germany

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  • Haisken-DeNew, John P.

    () (Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research)

  • Sinning, Mathias

    () (Australian National University)

Abstract

This paper aims at providing empirical evidence on social exclusion of immigrants in Germany. We demonstrate that when using a conventional definition of the social inclusion index typically applied in the literature, immigrants appear to experience a significant degree of social deprivation and exclusion, confirming much of the economic literature examining the economic assimilation of immigrants in Germany. We propose a weighting scheme that weights components of social inclusion by their subjective contribution to an overall measure of life satisfaction. Using this weighting scheme to calculate an index of social inclusion, we find that immigrants are in fact as “included" as Germans. This result is driven strongly by the disproportionately positive socio-demographic characteristics that immigrants possess as measured by the contribution to their life satisfaction.

Suggested Citation

  • Haisken-DeNew, John P. & Sinning, Mathias, 2007. "Social Deprivation and Exclusion of Immigrants in Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 3153, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp3153
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    Cited by:

    1. Vincent A. Hildebrand & María Noel Pi Alperin & Philippe Van Kerm, 2017. "Measuring and Accounting for the Deprivation Gap of Portuguese Immigrants in Luxembourg," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 63(2), pages 288-309, June.
    2. Guio, Anne-Catherine & Fusco, Alessio & Marlier, Eric, 2009. "A European Union Approach to Material Deprivation using EU-SILC and Eurobarometer data," IRISS Working Paper Series 2009-19, IRISS at CEPS/INSTEAD.
    3. repec:lan:wpaper:2921 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Liliana Fernandes & Américo Mendes & Aurora Teixeira, 2013. "A Weighted Multidimensional Index of Child Well-Being Which Incorporates Children’s Individual Perceptions," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 114(3), pages 803-829, December.
    5. Colin Green & Parvinder Kler & Gareth Leeves, 2010. "Flexible Contract Workers in Inferior Jobs: Reappraising the Evidence," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 48(3), pages 605-629, September.
    6. Sonja C. Kassenboehmer & Christoph M. Schmidt, 2010. "Beyond GDP and Back: What is the Value-Added by Additional Components of Welfare Measurement?," Working Paper Series of the German Council for Social and Economic Data 167, German Council for Social and Economic Data (RatSWD).
    7. Maite Blázquez Cuesta & Elena Cottini & Herrarte, A. (Ainhoa), 2012. "GINI DP 39: Socioeconomic Gradient in Health: How Important is Material Deprivation?," GINI Discussion Papers 39, AIAS, Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labour Studies.
    8. Pfeiffer, Friedhelm & Seiberlich, Ruben R., 2009. "A socio-economic analysis of youth disconnectedness," ZEW Discussion Papers 09-070, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    international migration; integration; social exclusion;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification

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