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A socio-economic analysis of youth disconnectedness

Author

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  • Pfeiffer, Friedhelm
  • Seiberlich, Ruben R.

Abstract

According to our research, some 12% of young people in Germany between the ages of 17 and 19 are disconnected, i.e. not in school, unemployed, and not living with a partner. The percentage of disconnected youths has been on the rise since 2002. There is evidence that an adverse family environment is the most important variable for being disconnected. Early life adversity influences the development of cognitive and noncognitive skills as well as school and labour market outcomes. Macroeconomic factors also contribute to disconnectedness. Recessions are followed by an increase in the number of disconnected youth.

Suggested Citation

  • Pfeiffer, Friedhelm & Seiberlich, Ruben R., 2009. "A socio-economic analysis of youth disconnectedness," ZEW Discussion Papers 09-070, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:zewdip:09070
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Cited by:

    1. Peter Frauke H. & Spiess C. Katharina, 2016. "Family Instability and Locus of Control in Adolescence," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 16(3), pages 1439-1471, September.
    2. Michael Weinhardt & Jürgen Schupp, 2011. "Multi-Itemskalen im SOEP Jugendfragebogen," Data Documentation 60, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    3. Fabrizio Pompei & Ekaterina Selezneva, 2015. "Education Mismatch, Human Capital and Labour Status of Young People across European Union Countries," Working Papers 347, Leibniz Institut für Ost- und Südosteuropaforschung (Institute for East and Southeast European Studies).
    4. repec:zbw:espost:168322 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Hoffmann, Sarah, 2010. "Schulabbrecher in Deutschland - eine bildungsstatistische Analyse mit aggregierten und Individualdaten," Discussion Papers 71, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Chair of Labour and Regional Economics.
    6. Dietrich, Hans, 2015. "Jugendarbeitslosigkeit aus einer europäischen Perspektive : theoretische Ansätze, empirische Konzepte und ausgewählte Befunde," IAB Discussion Paper 201524, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Disconnected youth; unemployment; school failure; life adversity;

    JEL classification:

    • D87 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Neuroeconomics
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth

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