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The impact of participation in sports on educational attainment--New evidence from Germany

  • Pfeifer, Christian
  • Cornelißen, Thomas

We analyze the impact of exercising sports during childhood and adolescence on educational attainment. The theoretical framework is based on models of allocation of time and educational productivity. Using the rich information from the German Socio-Economic Panel (GSOEP), we apply generalized ordered probit models to estimate the effect of participation in sport activities on secondary school degrees and professional degrees. Even after controlling for important variables and selection into sport, we find strong evidence that the effect of sport on educational attainment is statistically significant and positive.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6VB9-4WR66K4-1/2/630f2247b7f7f546ef296c80d9a6f2e2
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics of Education Review.

Volume (Year): 29 (2010)
Issue (Month): 1 (February)
Pages: 94-103

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:29:y:2010:i:1:p:94-103
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/econedurev

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  1. Muriel Niederle & Lise Vesterlund, 2007. "Do Women Shy Away from Competition? Do Men Compete Too Much?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 122(3), pages 1067-1101, 08.
  2. Betsey Stevenson, 2006. "Beyond the classroom: using Title IX to measure the return to high school sports," Working Paper Series 2006-44, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
  3. Joshua D. Angrist, 1991. "Instrumental Variables Estimation of Average Treatment Effects in Econometrics and Epidemiology," NBER Technical Working Papers 0115, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  6. Stefan Boes & Rainer Winkelmann, 2005. "Ordered Response Models," SOI - Working Papers 0507, Socioeconomic Institute - University of Zurich.
  7. Peter Sloane, 2006. "Rottenberg and the Economics of Sport after 50 years: An Evaluation," Working Papers 0608, International Association of Sports Economists;North American Association of Sports Economists.
  8. Aldo Rustichini & Uri Gneezy, 2004. "Gender and competition at a young age," Framed Field Experiments 00151, The Field Experiments Website.
  9. John M. Barron & Bradley T. Ewing & Glen R. Waddell, 2000. "The Effects Of High School Athletic Participation On Education And Labor Market Outcomes," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 82(3), pages 409-421, August.
  10. John Robst & Jack Keil, 2000. "The relationship between athletic participation and academic performance: evidence from NCAA Division III," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(5), pages 547-558.
  11. Long, James E & Caudill, Steven B, 1991. "The Impact of Participation in Intercollegiate Athletics on Income and Graduation," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 73(3), pages 525-31, August.
  12. Michael P. Murray, 2006. "Avoiding Invalid Instruments and Coping with Weak Instruments," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 20(4), pages 111-132, Fall.
  13. Nicola Persico & Andrew Postlewaite & Dan Silverman, 2003. "The Effect of Adolescent Experience on Labor Market Outcomes: The Case of Height," PIER Working Paper Archive 03-036, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania.
  14. Pfeiffer, Friedhelm & Reuß, Karsten, 2007. "Age-dependent Skill Formation and Returns to Education," ZEW Discussion Papers 07-015, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
  15. Uri Gneezy & Muriel Niederle & Aldo Rustichini, 2003. "Performance In Competitive Environments: Gender Differences," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 118(3), pages 1049-1074, August.
  16. Eide, Eric R. & Ronan, Nick, 2001. "Is participation in high school athletics an investment or a consumption good?: Evidence from high school and beyond," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 20(5), pages 431-442, October.
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