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That instrument is lousy! In search of agreement when using instrumental variables estimation in substance use research

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  • Michael T. French
  • Ioana Popovici

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  • Michael T. French & Ioana Popovici, 2011. "That instrument is lousy! In search of agreement when using instrumental variables estimation in substance use research," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(2), pages 127-146, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:20:y:2011:i:2:p:127-146
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    Cited by:

    1. Eiji Yamamura, 2011. "Differences in the effect of social capital on health status between workers and non-workers," International Review of Economics, Springer;Happiness Economics and Interpersonal Relations (HEIRS), vol. 58(4), pages 385-400, December.
    2. Fiorillo, Damiano & Sabatini, Fabio, 2015. "Structural social capital and health in Italy," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 17(C), pages 129-142.
    3. Ou Yang & Xueyan Zhao & Preety Srivastava, 2015. "Binge Drinking, Antisocial and Unlawful Behaviours, and Beverage Types," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2015n03, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    4. Palali, Ali, 2015. "Early Smoking, Education, and Labor Market Performance," Discussion Paper 2015-033, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    5. Deborah A. Cobb-Clark & Sonja C. Kassenboehmer & Trinh Le & Duncan McVicar & Rong Zhang, 2015. "‘High’-School: The Relationship between Early Marijuana Use and Educational Outcomes," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 91(293), pages 247-266, June.
    6. Gimenez-Nadal, J. Ignacio & Molina, José Alberto, 2015. "Voluntary Activities and Daily Happiness in the US," IZA Discussion Papers 8764, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Lionel Perini & Joachim Marti, 2013. "The impact of cannabis use on short-term educatonal outcomes," IRENE Working Papers 13-03, IRENE Institute of Economic Research.
    8. Sayed, Bisma Ali & French, Michael T., 2016. "To your health!: Re-examining the health benefits of moderate alcohol use," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 167(C), pages 20-28.
    9. Ioana Popovici & Michael T. French, 2013. "Does Unemployment Lead to Greater Alcohol Consumption?," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(2), pages 444-466, April.
    10. Palali, Ali, 2017. "Early smoking, education, and labor market performance," Other publications TiSEM a3763677-b112-4fea-a9f3-5, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    11. repec:kap:decono:v:165:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s10645-017-9290-y is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Wen, Hefei & Hockenberry, Jason M. & Cummings, Janet R., 2015. "The effect of medical marijuana laws on adolescent and adult use of marijuana, alcohol, and other substances," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 64-80.
    13. Geiger, Ben Baumberg & MacKerron, George, 2016. "Can alcohol make you happy? A subjective wellbeing approach," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 156(C), pages 184-191.
    14. Ou Yang & Xueyan Zhao & Preety Srivastava, 2016. "Binge Drinking and Antisocial and Unlawful Behaviours in Australia," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 92(297), pages 222-240, June.
    15. Maclean, Johanna Catherine & French, Michael T., 2014. "Personality disorders, alcohol use, and alcohol misuse," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 120(C), pages 286-300.
    16. Jon P. Nelson & Amy D. McNall, 2017. "What happens to drinking when alcohol policy changes? A review of five natural experiments for alcohol taxes, prices, and availability," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 18(4), pages 417-434, May.
    17. repec:spr:demogr:v:55:y:2018:i:4:d:10.1007_s13524-018-0682-7 is not listed on IDEAS
    18. Hefei Wen & Jason M. Hockenberry & Janet R. Cummings, 2014. "The Effect of Substance Use Disorder Treatment Use on Crime: Evidence from Public Insurance Expansions and Health Insurance Parity Mandates," NBER Working Papers 20537, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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