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Cannabis Use and Its Effects on Health, Education and Labor Market Success

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  • van Ours, Jan C
  • Williams, Jenny

Abstract

Cannabis is the most popular illegal drug. Its legal status is typically justified on the grounds that cannabis use has harmful consequences. Empirically investigating this issue has been a fertile topic for research in recent times. We provide an overview of this literature, focusing on studies which seek to establish the causal effect of cannabis use on health, education and labor market success. We conclude that there do not appear to be serious harmful health effects of moderate cannabis use. Nevertheless, there is evidence of reduced mental well-being for heavy users who are susceptible to mental health problems. While there is robust evidence that early cannabis use reduces educational attainment, there remains substantial uncertainty as to whether using cannabis has adverse labor market effects.

Suggested Citation

  • van Ours, Jan C & Williams, Jenny, 2014. "Cannabis Use and Its Effects on Health, Education and Labor Market Success," CEPR Discussion Papers 9932, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:9932
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Williams, Jenny & van Ours, Jan C., 2017. "Early Cannabis Use and School to Work Transition of Young Men," IZA Discussion Papers 10488, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Palali, Ali & van Ours, Jan C, 2014. "Cannabis Use and Support for Cannabis Legalization," CEPR Discussion Papers 9944, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. repec:spr:empeco:v:53:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s00181-016-1172-7 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:eee:eecrev:v:111:y:2019:i:c:p:211-236 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Moschion, Julie & van Ours, Jan C., 2019. "Do childhood experiences of parental separation lead to homelessness?," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 111(C), pages 211-236.
    6. Sabia, Joseph J. & Nguyen, Thanh Tam, 2016. "The Effect of Medical Marijuana Laws on Labor Market Outcomes," IZA Discussion Papers 9831, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    7. Williams, Jenny & van Ours, Jan C., 2017. "Early Cannabis Use and School to Work Transition of Young Men," IZA Discussion Papers 10488, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    cannabis use; education; health; labor market;

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • J10 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - General

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