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Keeping off the grass? An econometric model of cannabis consumption in Britain


  • Stephen Pudney

    (Department of Economics, University of Leicester, UK)


This paper presents estimates of a dynamic individual-level model of cannabis consumption, using data from a 1998 survey of young people in Britain. The econometric model is a split-population generalization of the non-stationary Poisson process, allowing for separate dynamic process for initiation into cannabis use and subsequent consumption. The model allows for heterogeneity in consumption levels and behavioural shifts induced by leaving education and the parental home. Copyright © 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Stephen Pudney, 2004. "Keeping off the grass? An econometric model of cannabis consumption in Britain," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(4), pages 435-453.
  • Handle: RePEc:jae:japmet:v:19:y:2004:i:4:p:435-453
    DOI: 10.1002/jae.746

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Labeaga, Jose M., 1999. "A double-hurdle rational addiction model with heterogeneity: Estimating the demand for tobacco," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 93(1), pages 49-72, November.
    2. Donald S. Kenkel & Joseph V. Terza, 2001. "The effect of physician advice on alcohol consumption: count regression with an endogenous treatment effect," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(2), pages 165-184.
    3. Becker, Gary S & Murphy, Kevin M, 1988. "A Theory of Rational Addiction," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 96(4), pages 675-700, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. van Ours, Jan C. & Williams, Jenny, 2007. "Cannabis prices and dynamics of cannabis use," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(3), pages 578-596, May.
    2. van Ours, Jan C. & Williams, Jenny, 2009. "Why parents worry: Initiation into cannabis use by youth and their educational attainment," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 132-142, January.
    3. van Ours, J.C., 2005. "Cannabis Use When it's Legal," Discussion Paper 2005-12, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    4. repec:zbw:rwirep:0061 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Harald Tauchmann, 2008. "West-East Convergence in the Prevalence of Illicit Drugs: Socioeconomics or Culture?," Ruhr Economic Papers 0061, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.
    6. Tauchmann, Harald, 2008. "West-East Convergence in the Prevalence of Illicit Drugs: Socioeconomics or Culture?," Economics Discussion Papers 2008-8, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    7. Jan Ours & Stephen Pudney, 2006. "On the Economics of Illicit Drugs," De Economist, Springer, vol. 154(4), pages 483-490, December.
    8. Sutherland, Alex, 2012. "Is parental socio-economic status related to the initiation of substance abuse by young people in an English city? An event history analysis," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 74(7), pages 1053-1061.
    9. Beau Kilmer & Rosalie Liccardo Pacula, 2010. "Preventing Drug Use," NBER Chapters,in: Targeting Investments in Children: Fighting Poverty When Resources are Limited, pages 181-220 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Tauchmann, Harald, 2008. "West-East Convergence in the Prevalence of Cannabis Use: Socioeconomics or Culture?," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 2, pages 1-27.
    11. Pudney, Stephen & Bryan, Mark & DelBono, Emilia, 2013. "Licensing and regulation of the cannabis market in England and Wales: Towards a cost-benefit analysis," MPRA Paper 50365, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Fabrice Etilé, 2006. "Who does the hat fit? Teenager heterogeneity and the effectiveness of information policies in preventing cannabis use and heavy drinking," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(7), pages 697-718.

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