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Psychiatric Disorders and Labor Market Outcomes: Evidence from the National Comorbidity Survey - Replication

  • Pinka Chatterji
  • Margarita Alegria
  • David Takeuchi

This paper uses the National Comorbidity Survey - Replication to estimate the effects of recent psychiatric disorder on employment, hours worked, and earnings. We employ methods proposed in Altonji, Elder and Taber (2005) which use selection on observable traits to provide information regarding selection along unobservable factors. Among males, disorder is associated with reductions of 13-17 percentage points in labor force participation and employment, depending on the sample and the model. Among females, we find smaller, less consistent associations between disorder and labor force participation and employment. There are no effects of disorder on earnings or hours worked among employed individuals.

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File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w14404.pdf
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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 14404.

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Date of creation: Oct 2008
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Publication status: published as Chatterji, Pinka & Alegria, Margarita & Takeuchi, David, 2011. "Psychiatric disorders and labor market outcomes: Evidence from the National Comorbidity Survey-Replication," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 858-868.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:14404
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