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Does Bingeing Affect Earnings?

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  • PREETY SRIVASTAVA

Abstract

Both anecdotal and empirical lines of evidence have pointed out that frequent binge drinking has far more serious consequences than occasional bingeing. As a result, a lower penalty for heavy drinking will be estimated by combining the heavy bingers with individuals who binge on rare occasions and are not necessarily less productive. This article explores the drinking–earnings relationship based on a finer distinction between frequent and occasional bingeing, and an extension to female subjects. It finds that frequent bingers experience reduced earnings whereas non-bingers and occasional bingers earn a positive premium over abstainers.

Suggested Citation

  • Preety Srivastava, 2010. "Does Bingeing Affect Earnings?," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 86(275), pages 578-595, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecorec:v:86:y:2010:i:275:p:578-595
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1475-4932.2010.00638.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Preety Srivastava & Xueyan Zhao, 2010. "What Do the Bingers Drink? Micro-Unit Evidence on Negative Externalities and Drinker Characteristics of Alcohol Consumption by Beverage Types," Economic Papers, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 29(2), pages 229-250, June.
    2. Preety Srivastava & Xueyan Zhao, 2010. "What Do the Bingers Drink? Microeconometric Evidence on Negative Externatilities of Alcohol Consumption by Beverage Types," Monash Econometrics and Business Statistics Working Papers 1/10, Monash University, Department of Econometrics and Business Statistics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    C3 ; D1 ; I1 ;

    JEL classification:

    • C3 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables
    • D1 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior
    • I1 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health

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