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What Do the Bingers Drink? Microeconometric Evidence on Negative Externatilities of Alcohol Consumption by Beverage Types

  • Preety Srivastava
  • Xueyan Zhao

    ()

The recent debate on alcohol tax reform and recommendations from the Henry Tax Review in Australia have highlighted the need for quantifying externalities of excessive alcohol consumption by beverage types. This paper presents micro-level information from the Australian National Drug Strategy Household Surveys to examine the association between risky drinking behaviour, drinker characteristics, health and labour market status, and types of alcohol beverages consumed. Drinkers of regular strength beer (RSB) and RTDs in a can (RTDC) have the highest incidences of heavy bingeing, and low alcohol beer and fortified and bottled wine least likely. Bottled spirits (BS), RSB and RTDC are most likely linked to risky behaviour such as property damage and physical abuse under alcohol influence. All three spirit products are overwhelmingly the favourable drinks for the underage and young drinkers. Risky drinking behaviour is not found to be strictly associated with the alcohol strength of the products.

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File URL: http://www.buseco.monash.edu.au/ebs/pubs/wpapers/2010/wp1-10.pdf
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Paper provided by Monash University, Department of Econometrics and Business Statistics in its series Monash Econometrics and Business Statistics Working Papers with number 1/10.

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Length: 28 pages
Date of creation: Jan 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:msh:ebswps:2010-1
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  1. Barrett, Garry F, 2002. "The Effect of Alcohol Consumption on Earnings," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 78(240), pages 79-96, March.
  2. Ramful, Preety & Zhao, Xueyan, 2006. "Heterogeneity in Alcohol Consumption: The Case of Beer, Wine and Spirits in Australia," 2006 Annual Meeting, August 12-18, 2006, Queensland, Australia 25359, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  3. Preety Ramful & Xueyan Zhao, 2008. "Individual Heterogeneity in Alcohol Consumption: The Case of Beer, Wine and Spirits in Australia," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 84(265), pages 207-222, 06.
  4. Bethany L. Peters & Edward Stringham, 2006. "No Booze? You May Lose: Why Drinkers Earn More Money Than Nondrinkers," Journal of Labor Research, Transaction Publishers, vol. 27(3), pages 411-421, June.
  5. Preety Srivastava, 2010. "Does Bingeing Affect Earnings?," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 86(275), pages 578-595, December.
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