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The association of alcohol dependency with employment probability: evidence from the population survey 'Health 2000 in Finland'

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  • Edvard Johansson

    (Swedish School of Economics and Business Administration, Helsinki, Finland)

  • Hannu Alho
  • Urpo Kiiskinen

    (Department of Health and Functional Capacity, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland)

  • Kari Poikolainen

Abstract

In this paper, we investigate to what extent alcohol-dependent individuals fare worse in the Finnish labour market, using data from a large Finnish health survey. We used the DSM-IV criteria for alcohol dependence assessed by a composite international diagnostic interview (CIDI). We find that there are substantial disadvantages for alcohol-dependent men and women in the labour market, in the sense that they have lower employment probabilities. Treating alcohol dependence as an exogenous variable, we find that alcohol dependence is associated with decrease in the probability of full-time or part-time work of around 14 percentage points for men and 11 percentage points for women. However, accounting for endogeneity increases the negative effect to some 50 percentage points for men and to some 40 percentage points for women. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Edvard Johansson & Hannu Alho & Urpo Kiiskinen & Kari Poikolainen, 2007. "The association of alcohol dependency with employment probability: evidence from the population survey 'Health 2000 in Finland'," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(7), pages 739-754.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:16:y:2007:i:7:p:739-754
    DOI: 10.1002/hec.1201
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. French, Michael T. & Zarkin, Gary A., 1995. "Is moderate alcohol use related to wages? Evidence from four worksites," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 319-344, August.
    2. William N. Evans & Robert M. Schwab, 1995. "Finishing High School and Starting College: Do Catholic Schools Make a Difference?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 110(4), pages 941-974.
    3. Vivian Hamilton & Barton H. Hamilton, 1997. "Alcohol and Earnings: Does Drinking Yield a Wage Premium," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 30(1), pages 135-151, February.
    4. Barrett, Garry F, 2002. "The Effect of Alcohol Consumption on Earnings," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 78(240), pages 79-96, March.
    5. Mullahy, John & Sindelar, Jody L, 1991. "Gender Differences in Labor Market Effects of Alcoholism," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(2), pages 161-165, May.
    6. Zarkin, Gary A. & French, Michael T. & Mroz, Thomas & Bray, Jeremy W., 1998. "Alcohol use and wages: New results from the national household survey on drug abuse," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 53-68, January.
    7. Ziggy MacDonald & Michael A. Shields, 2004. "Does problem drinking affect employment? Evidence from England," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(2), pages 139-155.
    8. Joshua D. Angrist, 1991. "Instrumental Variables Estimation of Average Treatment Effects in Econometrics and Epidemiology," NBER Technical Working Papers 0115, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Anna Baranowska-Rataj & Anna Matysiak, 2016. "The Causal Effects of the Number of Children on Female Employment - Do European Institutional and Gender Conditions Matter?," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 37(3), pages 343-367, September.
    2. Boden, Joseph M. & Lee, Jungeun Olivia & Horwood, L. John & Grest, Carolina Villamil & McLeod, Geraldine F.H., 2017. "Modelling possible causality in the associations between unemployment, cannabis use, and alcohol misuse," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 175(C), pages 127-134.
    3. Johansson, Edvard & Böckerman, Petri & Kiiskinen, Urpo & Heliövaara, Markku, 2009. "Obesity and labour market success in Finland: The difference between having a high BMI and being fat," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 7(1), pages 36-45, March.
    4. Ioana Popovici & Michael T. French, 2013. "Does Unemployment Lead to Greater Alcohol Consumption?," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(2), pages 444-466, April.
    5. Justus Haucap & Annika Herr, 2014. "A note on social drinking: In Vino Veritas," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 37(3), pages 381-392, June.
    6. Anna Baranowska, 2013. "The family size effects on female employment. Evidence from the “natural experiments” related to human reproduction," Working Papers 57, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.

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