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The relationship between athletic participation and academic performance: evidence from NCAA Division III

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  • John Robst
  • Jack Keil

Abstract

This paper examines athletes' grades and graduation rates at an NCAA Division III institution. Thirty-seven per cent of all college athletes compete in Division III, yet this group has received little attention in the literature. Nontransfer student-athletes have higher GPAs than nonathletes, while transfer student-athletes have grades similar to nonathletes. Graduation rates are higher for athletes. Thus, athletic participation does not impair students' academic performance.

Suggested Citation

  • John Robst & Jack Keil, 2000. "The relationship between athletic participation and academic performance: evidence from NCAA Division III," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(5), pages 547-558.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:32:y:2000:i:5:p:547-558
    DOI: 10.1080/000368400322453
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Tucker, Irvin III & Amato, Louis, 1993. "Does big-time success in football or basketball affect SAT scores?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 12(2), pages 177-181, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Roberto Gásquez & Vicente Royuela, 2014. "Is Football an Indicator of Development at the International Level?," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 117(3), pages 827-848, July.
    2. Michael Insler & Jimmy Karam, 2016. "Do Sports Crowd Out Books? The Impact of Intercollegiate Athletic Participation on Grades," Departmental Working Papers 50, United States Naval Academy Department of Economics.
    3. Pfeifer, Christian & Cornelißen, Thomas, 2010. "The impact of participation in sports on educational attainment--New evidence from Germany," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 94-103, February.
    4. Kavetsos, Georgios, 2011. "The impact of physical activity on employment," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 40(6), pages 775-779.
    5. Georgios Kavetsos, 2011. "Physical Activity and Subjective Well-being: An Empirical Analysis," Chapters,in: The Economics of Sport, Health and Happiness, chapter 11 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    6. Albert Okunade & Andrew Hussey & Mustafa Karakus, 2009. "Overweight Adolescents and On-time High School Graduation: Racial and Gender Disparities," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 37(3), pages 225-242, September.
    7. repec:eee:spomar:v:20:y:2017:i:4:p:365-378 is not listed on IDEAS

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