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The Faculty Flutie Factor: Does Football Performance Affect a University’s US News and World Report Peer Assessment Score?


  • Mulholland, Sean
  • Tomic, Aleksandar
  • Sholander, Samuel


Analyzing the peer assessment portion of the US News and World Report’s college rankings, we find that administrators and faculty rate more highly universities whose football team receives a greater number of votes in either the final Associated Press or Coaches Poll. Controlling for unobserved heterogeneity, our estimates suggest that a one standard deviation increase in the number of votes received in either the Associated Press or USA Today Coaches’ Football Poll is viewed as positively as a forty point increase in a school’s SAT score at the 75th percentile.

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  • Mulholland, Sean & Tomic, Aleksandar & Sholander, Samuel, 2010. "The Faculty Flutie Factor: Does Football Performance Affect a University’s US News and World Report Peer Assessment Score?," MPRA Paper 26443, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:26443

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    Blog mentions

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    1. Football has an impact on college quality
      by Economic Logician in Economic Logic on 2010-12-13 21:10:00
    2. How Football Improves College Quality
      by Ariel Goldring in Free Market Mojo on 2010-12-16 18:00:31


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    More about this item


    college football; football bowl subdivision; national universities; peer assessment;

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • I23 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Higher Education; Research Institutions
    • L83 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Sports; Gambling; Restaurants; Recreation; Tourism

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