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What Does Intercollegiate Athletics Do To or For Colleges and Universities?

Author

Listed:
  • Malcolm Getz

    () (Department of Economics, Vanderbilt University)

  • John Siegfried

    () (American Economic Association, Department of Economics, Vanderbilt University, University of Adelaide, South Australia)

Abstract

What tangible benefit do universities who participate in major televised sports achieve from their commitment? The essay reviews the evidence on the gains in public funding, attraction of philanthropy, increases in applicants and selectivity, and the influence on students. Ultimately, what is the opportunity cost of an institution's financial stake in what may be close to a zero sum game?

Suggested Citation

  • Malcolm Getz & John Siegfried, 2010. "What Does Intercollegiate Athletics Do To or For Colleges and Universities?," Vanderbilt University Department of Economics Working Papers 1005, Vanderbilt University Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:van:wpaper:1005
    as

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    File URL: http://www.accessecon.com/pubs/VUECON/vu10-w05.pdf
    File Function: Revised version, May 2010
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Dennis Coates & Craig A. Depken, II, 2008. "Do College Football Games Pay for Themselves? The Impact of College Football Games on Local Sales Tax Revenue," Working Papers 0802, International Association of Sports Economists;North American Association of Sports Economists.
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    3. Sarah E. Turner & Lauren A. Meserve & William G. Bowen, 2001. "Winning and Giving: Football Results and Alumni Giving at Selective Private Colleges and Universities," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 82(4), pages 812-826.
    4. Bremmer, Dale S. & Kesselring, Randall G., 1993. "The advertising effect of university athletic success: A reappraisal of the evidence," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 409-421.
    5. Amato, Louis & Gandar, John M. & Tucker, Irvin B. & Zuber, Richard A., 1996. "Bowls versus playoffs: The impact on football player graduation rates in the national collegiate athletic association," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 15(2), pages 187-195, April.
    6. Wunnava, Phanindra V. & Lauze, Michael A., 2001. "Alumni giving at a small liberal arts college: evidence from consistent and occasional donors," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 20(6), pages 533-543, December.
    7. F. G. Mixon & L. J. TreviNO & T. C. Minto, 2004. "Touchdowns and test scores: exploring the relationship between athletics and academics," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(7), pages 421-424.
    8. Tucker, Irvin III & Amato, Louis, 1993. "Does big-time success in football or basketball affect SAT scores?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 12(2), pages 177-181, June.
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    10. Patrick James Rishe, 2003. "A Reexamination of How Athletic Success Impacts Graduation Rates," American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 62(2), pages 407-427, April.
    11. Long, James E & Caudill, Steven B, 1991. "The Impact of Participation in Intercollegiate Athletics on Income and Graduation," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 73(3), pages 525-531, August.
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    13. Louis H. Amato & John M. Gandar & Richard A. Zuber, 2001. "The Impact of Proposition 48 on the Relationship Between Football Success and Football Player Graduation Rates," Journal of Sports Economics, , vol. 2(2), pages 101-112, May.
    14. David J. Zimmerman, 2003. "Peer Effects in Academic Outcomes: Evidence from a Natural Experiment," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 85(1), pages 9-23, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Allen R. Sanderson & John J. Siegfried, 2015. "The Case for Paying College Athletes," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 29(1), pages 115-138, Winter.
    2. Adam Hoffer & Brad R. Humphreys & Donald J. Lacombe & Jane E. Ruseski, 2014. "The NCAA Athletics Arms Race: Theory and Evidence," Working Papers 14-29, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    sports; athletics; university; college; philanthropy; admissions; students;

    JEL classification:

    • I23 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Higher Education; Research Institutions
    • L83 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Sports; Gambling; Restaurants; Recreation; Tourism

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