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A reexamination of the effect of big-time football and basketball success on graduation rates and alumni giving rates


  • Tucker, Irvin B.


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  • Tucker, Irvin B., 2004. "A reexamination of the effect of big-time football and basketball success on graduation rates and alumni giving rates," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(6), pages 655-661, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:23:y:2004:i:6:p:655-661

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. TA. Rhoads & S. Gerking, 2000. "Educational contributions, academic quality, and athletic success," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 18(2), pages 248-258, April.
    2. McCormick, Robert E & Tensley, Maurice, 1987. "Athletics versus Academics? Evidence from SAT Scores," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 95(5), pages 1103-1116, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Michael L. Anderson, 2012. "The Benefits of College Athletic Success: An Application of the Propensity Score Design with Instrumental Variables," NBER Working Papers 18196, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Roberto Gásquez & Vicente Royuela, 2014. "Is Football an Indicator of Development at the International Level?," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 117(3), pages 827-848, July.
    3. Matheson, Victor A., 2007. "Research note: Athletic graduation rates and Simpson's Paradox," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 26(4), pages 516-520, August.
    4. repec:bla:coecpo:v:35:y:2017:i:4:p:658-676 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Robert Baade & Robert Baumann & Victor Matheson, 2007. "Down, Set, Hike: The Economic Impact of College Football Games on Local Economies," Working Papers 0702, College of the Holy Cross, Department of Economics.
    6. Julianne Treme & Robert T. Burrus, 2016. "NCAA basketball: when does recruiting talent translate into wins for power conferences?," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 40(4), pages 735-753, October.
    7. John Fizel & Charles Brown, 2014. "Assessing the Determinants of NCAA Football Violations," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 42(3), pages 277-290, September.
    8. Mulholland, Sean E. & Tomic, Aleksandar (Sasha) & Sholander, Samuel N., 2014. "The faculty Flutie factor: Does football performance affect a university's US News and World Report peer assessment score?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 79-90.
    9. Steven Salaga & Rodney Fort, 2017. "Structural Change in Competitive Balance in Big-Time College Football," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer;The Industrial Organization Society, vol. 50(1), pages 27-41, February.
    10. Gregory B. Murphy & Neil Tocher & Bryant Ward, 2016. "An Examination of Public Private Academic Partnerships: Does Program Success Enhance University Performance Outcomes?," Public Organization Review, Springer, vol. 16(1), pages 95-115, March.

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