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Young and Out in Germany: On the Youths' Chances of Labor Market Entrance in Germany

  • Wolfgang Franz
  • Joachim Inkmann
  • Winfried Pohlmeier
  • Volker Zimmermann

This paper deals with the labor market entrance of young people in the Federal Republic" of Germany. The main focus is on failures during this stage. First, an overview of the youth" labor market in Germany is given. Then, the transition from vocational training to work is" analyzed: The duration of the first spell of non-employment after completion of formal" vocational training is analyzed by means of a proportional hazard function approach. Besides the" strong influence of the human capital variables there is a striking effect of the family background" of the youths. The following section addresses the extent to which early failures in the work" history have long-lasting effects on future incomes. There is some evidence for a permanent" income reduction.

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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 6212.

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Date of creation: Oct 1997
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Publication status: published as Wolfgang Franz & Joachim Inkmann & Winfried Pohlmeier & Volker Zimmermann, 2000. "Young and Out in Germany (On Youths? Chances of Labor Market Entrance in Germany)," NBER Chapters, in: Youth Employment and Joblessness in Advanced Countries, pages 381-426 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:6212
Note: LS
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  1. Rainer Winkelmann, 1997. "How young workers get their training: A survey of Germany versus the United States," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 10(2), pages 159-170.
  2. Harhoff, Dietmar & Kane, Thomas J, 1996. "Is the German Apprenticeship System a Panacea for the US Labour Market?," CEPR Discussion Papers 1311, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Lynch, Lisa M, 1989. "The Youth Labor Market in the Eighties: Determinants of Re-employment Probabilities for Young Men and Women," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 71(1), pages 37-45, February.
  4. Rainer Winkelmann, 1996. "Employment prospects and skill acquisition of apprenticeship-trained workers in Germany," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 49(4), pages 658-672, July.
  5. Lynch, Lisa M., 1985. "State dependency in youth unemployment : A lost generation?," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 71-84, April.
  6. Han, Aaron & Hausman, Jerry A, 1990. "Flexible Parametric Estimation of Duration and Competing Risk Models," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 5(1), pages 1-28, January-M.
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